ORDINANCE NO. 2019 - 02

 

An ORDINANCE to repeal and replace Title 17 of the Davenport Municipal Code, entitled, “Zoning”, in its entirety and to adopt a new zoning ordinance and map for the City; to amend several sections of Title 2 of the Davenport Municipal Code, entitled, “Administration and Personnel”; and to amend Title 14 of the Davenport Municipal Code, entitled, “Reserved”, by renaming the title, “Historic Preservation”, and moving said provisions from Title 17 to Title 14. [All Wards]

 

NOW, BE IT ENACTED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DAVENPORT, IOWA:

 

Section 1: That Title 17 of the Davenport Municipal Code, entitled, “Zoning” is hereby repealed and replaced with the following:

 

CHAPTER 17.01. TITLE, PURPOSE, & APPLICABILITY

Section 17.01.010 Title

Section 17.01.020 Purpose

Section 17.01.030 Applicability

Section 17.01.040 Transition Rules

Section 17.01.050 Severability

 

Section 17.01.010  Title

This Ordinance is known, cited, and referred to as the “Zoning Ordinance of the City of Davenport, Iowa,” “Zoning Ordinance,” or “Ordinance,” and incorporates the City of Davenport Official Zoning Map.

 

Section 17.01.020  Purpose

The intent of this document is to establish zoning regulations to serve the City of Davenport, which may be cited as “the City” or “City.” This Zoning Ordinance is adopted for the following purposes:

A.            To promote and protect the public health, safety, and welfare.

B.            To promote the orderly development of Davenport in accordance with the Comprehensive Plan and adopted land use policies.

C.            To organize the City into zoning districts, according to use of land and structures, height and bulk of structures, intensity of use of the lot, or other classification, as deemed best suited to carry out the purposes of this Ordinance.

D.            To protect the character and maintain the stability of the City’s residential and non-residential areas.

E.            To preserve and enhance the value of structures, communities, and neighborhoods that constitute the distinct places within the City.

F.             To promote infill development.

G.            To promote economic development within the City that balances the needs of the current and future economy with a high quality-of-life standard.

H.            To promote the preservation, protection, and conservation of natural resources.

I.              To protect against fire, explosions, noxious fumes, and other dangers.

J.             To provide for the gradual elimination of nonconformities.

K.            To define and limit the powers and duties of the administrative officers and bodies as provided in this Ordinance.

L.             To prescribe penalties for the violation of and methods for the enforcement of the provisions of this Ordinance.

 

Section 17.01.030  Applicability

A. Territorial Application

This Ordinance applies to all land, uses, and structures within the corporate limits of the City of Davenport. However, per Section 17.03.040, rights-of-way and utilities are not controlled by this Zoning Ordinance.

B. General Application

In their interpretation and application, the provisions of this Ordinance are held to be the minimum requirements for the promotion and protection of the public health, safety, and welfare.

C. Required Conformance

Any part or whole of a structure must be erected, constructed, reconstructed, moved, and enlarged in conformance with the requirements of this Ordinance. Any structure or land must be used and occupied in conformance with the requirements of this Ordinance.

D. Relation to Private Agreements

This Ordinance does not nullify any private agreement or covenant. However, where this Ordinance is more restrictive than a private agreement or covenant, this Ordinance controls. The City will not enforce any private agreement or covenant.

E. Relation to Other Laws and Regulations

Unless otherwise specifically provided, this Ordinance controls over less restrictive City statutes, ordinances, or regulations, and more City restrictive statutes, ordinances, or regulations control over the provisions of this Ordinance.

F.             Rules of Ordinance Construction

This Ordinance contains graphics in order to assist the user in understanding and applying the Ordinance. However, where there is any inconsistency between the text of this Ordinance and any such graphics, the text controls unless otherwise specifically stated. 

 

Section 17.01.040  Transition Rules

 

A. Existing Illegal Structures and Uses

A structure or use that is illegal at the time of the adoption of, but is made legal by the provisions of this Ordinance, is deemed lawful as of the effective date of this Ordinance. However, if that structure or use does not conform to every requirement of this Ordinance, then that structure or use remains illegal and is subject to the enforcement provisions of this Ordinance.

B. Existing Uses

 

1.     If a structure or land is used in a manner that was classified as a permitted use prior to the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, and now that use is classified as a permitted use as of the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, that use is classified as a permitted use.

2.     If a structure or land is used in a manner that was classified as a special use prior to the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, and now that use is classified as a special use as of the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, that use is classified as a special use and subject to the approval conditions under which it was originally approved.

3.     If a structure or land is used in a manner that was classified as a permitted use prior to the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, and now that use is classified as a special use as of the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, that use is deemed a special use. Any subsequent addition, enlargement, or expansion of that use must conform to the procedural and substantive requirements of this Ordinance for special uses.

4.     If a structure or land is used in a manner that was classified as a special use prior to the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, and that use is now classified as a permitted use as of the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, that use is deemed a permitted use. Any subsequent addition, enlargement, or expansion of that use must conform to any Ordinance requirements for such permitted use and is no longer subject to any approval conditions under which it was originally approved.

5.     If a structure or land is used in a manner that was classified as permitted or special use prior to the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, but this Ordinance no longer classifies that use as either a permitted or special use in the zoning district in which it is located, that use is deemed a nonconforming use and is controlled by the provisions of Chapter 17.15.

C. Structures Rendered Nonconforming

If a structure existing on the effective date of this Ordinance was a conforming structure before the effective date of this Ordinance, but such structure does not meet all standards set forth in this Ordinance in the zoning district in which it is located, that structure is deemed a nonconforming structure and is controlled by the provisions of Chapter 17.15.

 

CHAPTER 17.02. GENERAL DEFINITIONS AND MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGIES

Section 17.02.010 RULES OF INTERPRETATION

Section 17.02.020 GENERAL ABBREVIATIONS

Section 17.02.030 DEFINITION OF GENERAL TERMS

Section 17.02.040 RULES OF MEASUREMENT

 

 

Section 17.02.010  Rules of Interpretation

The terms in the text of this Ordinance are interpreted in accordance with the following rules of construction:

A.            The singular number includes the plural, and the plural the singular.

B.            The present tense includes the past and future tenses, and the future tense includes the present.

C.            The terms “must,” “shall,” and “will” are mandatory.

D.            The term “may” is permissive.

E.            The terms “must not,” “will not,” and “shall not” are prohibiting.

F.            Any gender includes all genders.

G. Whenever a defined word or term appears in the text of this Ordinance, its meaning must be construed as set forth in the definition. Words not defined must be interpreted in accordance with the definitions considered to be normal dictionary usage.

 

Section 17.02.020  General Abbreviations

The following abbreviations may be used within this Ordinance:

A.            BTL is an abbreviation for “build-to line.”

B.            BTZ is an abbreviation for “build-to zone.”

C.            GFA is an abbreviation for “gross floor area.”

D.            ft is an abbreviation for “feet.”

E.            N/A is an abbreviation for “not applicable.”

F.            sf is an abbreviation for “square feet.”

G.            SF is an abbreviation for “single-family.”

H.            2F is an abbreviation for “two-family.”

I.              TH is an abbreviation for “townhouse.”

J.             MF is an abbreviation for “multi-family.”

 

Section 17.02.030  Definition of General Terms

The following are definitions of general terms used throughout this Ordinance with the exception of use definitions, which are defined in Chapter 17.08.

Abut. To share a common wall or lot line without being separated by a street or alley.

Accessibility Ramp. A ramp or similar structure that provides wheelchair or similar access to a structure.

Accessory Structure. A detached structure located on the same lot as the principal building that is incidental to the use of the principal building.

Accessory Use. A use of land or a structure, or portion thereof, customarily incidental and subordinate to the principal use of the land or structure.

Addition. Construction that increases the size of a structure in terms of building footprint, height, or floor area.

Alley. A public right-of-way that normally affords a secondary means of access to abutting property.

Amateur (HAM) Radio Equipment. An amateur (HAM) radio station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), including equipment such as, but not limited to, a tower or building-mounted structure supporting a radiating antenna platform and other equipment.

Ancillary. In regard to principal uses, a structure or use that provides support and is typically integral to a principal structure or use.

Aquaculture/Aquaponics. A structure designed for the farming of aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and aquatic plants under controlled conditions

Architectural Feature. A part or projection that contributes to the aesthetics of a structure, exclusive of signs, that is not necessary for the structural integrity of the structure or to make the structure habitable.

Attention Getting Device. Signs, devices, or ornamentations designed for the purpose of attracting attention or promotion, except as otherwise expressly permitted in this Ordinance. Attention getting devices include banners, sails/feather signs, temporary on-premise pole signs, and the like. Federal, state, or local flags, or flags of fraternal, religious, and civic organizations, banners, and temporary holiday decorations are not considered attention getting devices.

Awning. A roof like structure typically made of cloth, metal, or other material attached to a frame that extends from and is supported by a building. Awnings are typically erected over a window, doorway, or building front and they may be raised or retracted to a position adjacent to the building.

Balcony. A roofed or unroofed platform that projects from the exterior wall of a structure above the ground floor, which is exposed to the open air, has direct access to the interior of the building, and is not supported by posts or columns extending to the ground.

Banner. A temporary sign printed upon flexible material mounted with or without rigid frames on a building or the ground.

Bay Window. A window that projects outward from the structure, which does not rest on the building foundation or on the ground.

Berm. An earthen mound designed to provide visual interest on a site, fully or partially screen undesirable views, reduce noise, or fulfill other similar purposes.

Block. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Blockface. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Blue Roof. A roof designed to store water and discharge rainfall.

Book Exchange Box. An outdoor accessory structure maintained by a property owner on private property where books and recorded performing arts and media are kept for public and/or exchanges with no fees or sales and are publicly accessible.

Buffer Yard. Land area with landscape plantings and other components used to separate one use from another and to shield or block noise, lights, or other nuisances.

Build-To Line (BTL). Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Build-To Zone (BTZ). Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Build-To Percentage. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Buildable Area.  The portion of a lot, excluding required setbacks, where a structure or building improvements may be erected.

Building. Any structure used or intended for supporting or sheltering any use or occupancy.

Building Envelope. The three-dimensional space within which a structure is permitted to be built on a lot and which is defined by regulations governing building setbacks, maximum height, and bulk, by other regulations, and/or by any combination thereof.

Building Coverage. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Building Height. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Building Line. A line measured at the building wall of a structure between parallel lot lines. For the purposes of establishing a building line, the building wall does not include permitted encroachments of architectural features, such as bay windows, eaves, and steps and stoops.

 

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BUILDING LINE

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Caliper. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Canopy. A canopy is a roof-like cover designed for protection from the weather or as a decorative embellishment affixed to a building or freestanding, with supports that extend to the ground.

Carport. An open-sided roofed vehicle shelter, usually formed by extension of the roof from the side of a building, but may be freestanding.

Changeable Message Board. A sign designed where a portion of the sign area allows for a message to be changed manually. A changeable message board sign does not include electronic message signs or portable reader-board sign.

Chimney. A vertical shaft of reinforced concrete, masonry or other approved material enclosing one or more flues, for the purpose of removing products of combustion from solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel.

Co-Location. Placement of equipment from more than one service or service provider on a single tower or site.

Contiguous. See abut.

Contour Line. Contour lines denote elevation or altitude and depth on maps.

Cross-Access. A vehicular and/or pedestrian connection between abutting properties that connects the two sites and allows vehicles and/or pedestrians to travel between sites without the having to exit to the street.

Day. A calendar day.

Deck. A roofless outdoor space built as an above ground platform projecting from the wall of a structure and connected by structural supports at grade or by the structure.

Development. Any man-made change to land.

Driveway. A pathway for motor vehicles from a street to a lot used only for service purposes or for access to the lot.

Dwelling. A structure, or portion thereof, designed or used exclusively for human habitation. Each dwelling type must contain 24 feet of width at its largest dimension and be located on a permanent foundation. Every room within a dwelling unit must be accessible from every other room within the dwelling via a completely internal route within the envelope of the dwelling structure.

Dwelling Unit. A structure or portion of a structure providing complete, independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation.

 

Easement. Land designed by lawful agreement between the owner(s) of the land and an entity(s) for a specified use only by such entity(s).

Eave. The projecting lower edges of a roof overhanging the wall of a structure.

Electronic Message Sign. A sign designed where a portion of the sign area uses changing light emitting diodes (LEDs), fiber optics, light bulbs or other illumination devices within the electronic display panel(s) to form a message or messages in text and/or image from where the sequence of messages and the rate of change is electronically programmed and can be modified by electronic processes. Time/temperature signs are not considered electronic message signs. Flashing signs, animated signs, and video display signs are not considered electronic message signs.

Encroachment. The extension or placement of any structure, or a component of such, into a required setback or right-of-way.

Equine. A member of the equus genus of mammals in the family Equidae, including horses and ponies. For the purposes of this Ordinance, zebras, while a member of the equus genus, are not permitted.

Erect. To build, construct, attach, hang, place, suspend, or affix.

External Illumination. Illumination by an artificial source of light not internal to the sign face.

Exterior Lighting. The illumination of an outside area or object by any man-made device that produces light by any means.

Exterior Stairwell. One or more flights of stairs, and the necessary landings and platforms connecting them, to form a continuous passage from the entryway of a floor or level to another in a structure located on the exterior of a principal building.

Feather Flag/Sail. A freestanding attention-getting device, vertical in orientation, typically constructed of cloth held taut by a single post.

 

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FEATHER FLAG/SAIL

 

Fence. A structure used as a boundary, screen, separation, means of privacy, protection or confinement, and is constructed of wood, plastic, metal, wire mesh, masonry, or other similar material and is used as a barrier.

1. Fence - Open. A fence that has, over its entirety, more than 70% of the superficial surface consisting of regularly distributed openings.

2. Fence - Solid. A fence that has, over its entirety, no distributed openings. A shadowbox design fence is considered a solid fence. A chain link fence with slats is not considered a solid fence.

 

FENC

Flag. Flags of any nation, state, municipality, or political subdivision, flags officially designated as a national, state, or local symbol, or flags of fraternal, religious, and civic organizations. Pennants and sails are not considered flags

Floodlight. A powerful light, typically in a grouping of several lights, used to illuminate the exterior of a building or sign.

Foot-Candle. A unit of measure of illuminance equal to one lumen of light spread over an area of one square foot.

Garage. A structure, either attached or detached, designed and/or used for the parking and storage of vehicles as an accessory structure to a residence. For the purposes of this definition, garage does not include an accessory structure with an access point of six feet or less in width or commercial parking structure.

Gazebo. A freestanding outdoor structure designed for recreational use and not for habitation.

Glare. Light emitting from a luminaire with an intensity great enough to reduce a viewers’ ability to see, cause discomfort, and, in extreme cases, cause momentary blindness.

Grade. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Green Roof. A building roof partially or completely covered with vegetation and a growing medium, planted over a waterproofing membrane. It may also include additional layers such as a root barrier and drainage and irrigation systems.

Greenhouse (Accessory). A structure constructed chiefly of glass, glasslike or translucent material, cloth, or lath, which is devoted to the protection or cultivation of flowers or other tender plants.

Gross Floor Area (GFA). Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Hedge. A row of closely planted shrubs, bushes, or any kind of plant forming a boundary.

Home Occupation. Any commercial activity carried out for economic gain by a resident, conducted as an accessory use in the resident's dwelling unit.

Impervious Surface Coverage. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Infrastructure. Facilities and services needed to sustain residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, and other activities, including, but not limited to, water lines, sewer lines, and rights-of-way.

Intensity of Use. Square feet of gross floor area, number of dwelling units, number of employees, or other factor used as a basis for requiring off-street parking or loading facilities.

Light Pole. Pole on which a luminaire is mounted.

Light Pole Banner. Banners mounted on and with arms installed perpendicular to light poles.

Loading Berth. A space within a loading facility exclusive of driveways, aisles, maneuvering areas, ramps, columns, landscape, and structures for the temporary parking of a commercial delivery vehicle while loading or unloading goods or materials.

Lot. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Area. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot, Corner. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Depth. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot, Interior. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line, Corner. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line, Front. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line, Interior. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line, Rear. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Line, Street. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot, Through. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Lot Width. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Marquee. A permanent roof-like structure constructed of permanent building materials that extends from the wall of a structure with no supports extending to the ground providing protection from the elements.

Menuboard. A sign constructed as part of drive-through facilities.

Multi-Tenant Retail Center. A group of two or more commercial establishments that is planned, owned, and/or managed as a single property. The two main configurations of multi-tenant retail centers are large shopping centers/malls and strip centers.

Noncommercial Message. The expression of noncommercial ideas and messages. A noncommercial message does not promote a business, product, service, commercial entertainment, or other commercial activity offered on or off the premises.

Nits. A luminance unit equal to one candle per square meter measured perpendicular to the rays from the source

Off-Premise Commercial Sign – Temporary. A temporary sign directing attention to a specific business, product, service, entertainment event, activity, or other commercial activity that is not sold, produced, manufactured, furnished, or conducted at the property upon which the sign is located. This includes any ground-mounted, building-mounted, or sign painted, pasted, or otherwise affixed to any tree, rock, fence, utility pole, hydrant, bridge, sidewalk, parkway, curb or street, bench, or trash receptacle that directs attention off-premises.

Off-Street Parking. The storage space for an automobile on premises other than streets or rights-of-way.

 

Open Space. That portion of land, either landscaped or left unimproved, which is used to meet active or passive recreation or spatial needs, and/or to protect water, air, or plant resources.

Outdoor Display and Sales Area. Part of a lot used for outdoor sales and/or display of goods accessory to the principal use.

Outlot. An area of land set aside within a retail center for a separate principal building that shares a circulation system and may share common parking with the larger retail center development but is separated from the principal building or buildings, typically located along the property line.

Overlay District. A district established in the Ordinance that is superimposed on one or more zoning districts or parts of zoning districts. The standards and requirements associated with an overlay district may be more or less restrictive than those in the underlying districts.

Owner. Any person, including the owner of the title or a mortgage whose interest is shown of record in the mortgage and conveyance records; a person shown as owner in the records of the tax assessor of the county in which the property is situated; or the agent of any such person and those in possession of a dwelling, dwelling unit, or premises.

Parapet. The extension of a false front or wall above a roof-line.

Party Wall. A wall starting from the foundation and extending continuously through all stories to or above the roof that separates one building from another, but is in joint use by each building.

Patio. A hard surface designed and intended for recreational use by people and not used as a parking space.

Pergola. An open structure, which may be either freestanding or attached to a structure, that forms a partially shaded pedestrian walkway, passageway, or sitting area, and is constructed of a semi-open roof and vertical posts that support cross-beams and a sturdy open lattice. It may also be used as an extension of a building entryway.

Pervious Paving. A range of sustainable materials and techniques for permeable paving with a base and sub-base that allow the movement of stormwater through the surface. Gravel and loose rock are not considered pervious paving.

Portable Reader-Board. A sign whose principal supporting structure is intended, by design and construction, to rest upon the ground for support and may be easily moved or relocated for reuse. Portable reader-board signs include, but are not limited to, signs mounted upon a trailer, wheeled carrier, or other non-motorized mobile structure, with wheels or with wheels removed. Portable reader-board signs do not include a-frame signs.

Porch. An architectural feature that projects from the exterior wall of a structure, has direct access to the street level of the building, and is covered by a roof or eaves.

Porch – Unenclosed. A porch that is open on all sides that do not abut a principal building wall.

Porch – Enclosed. A porch enclosed by walls, screens, lattice or other material. A screened-in porch is an enclosed porch.

Porte Cochere. A permanent structure built over a driveway or entry drive that provides temporary shelter to persons exiting a vehicle, but not serving as the only covered or enclosed vehicle shelter on-site.

Property Line. For the purposes of this Ordinance, a property line is a lot line. (See lot line definition.)

Principal Building. A non-accessory structure in which a principal use of the lot on which it is located is conducted.

Principal Use. The main use of land or structures as distinguished from an accessory use.

Recreational Vehicle. Any vehicle or boat designed for temporary living quarters, recreation, or temporary human habitation and not used as a commercial vehicle including, but not limited to, the following: boat/watercraft, camper trailer, motorized trailer, off-road vehicle, racing car or cycle, travel trailer, and truck camper.

Right-of-Way. A strip of land dedicated for use as a public way. In addition to the roadway, it typically incorporates the curbs, parkways, sidewalks, and shoulders.

Roofline. The top edge of a roof or building parapet, whichever is higher, excluding any cupolas, pylons, chimneys or minor projections.

Satellite Dish Antenna. A dish antenna designed for transmitting signals to a receiver or receiving station or for receiving television, radio, data, communication or other signals from other antennas, satellites or other services.

Searchlight. An attention-getting device where an artificial light of high intensity is shined upward in a focused beam and can turn in any direction to attract attention to a location. Also known as sky-beams or sky spotlights.

Setback. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Setback, Front. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Setback, Interior Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Setback, Corner Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Setback, Rear. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Setback, Reverse Corner Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Shed. An accessory structure, often purchased pre-built or as a kit in pre-fabricated sections, that is not designed to be served by heat or plumbing and does not need to be placed on a permanent foundation. A shed is typically intended to store lawn, garden, or recreational equipment.

Sign. A lettered, numbered, symbolic, pictorial, or illuminated visual display designed to identify, announce, direct, or inform that is visible from a public right of way.

 

Sign, A-Frame. A temporary sign ordinarily in the shape of the letter “A” or some variation thereof, which is displayed on the ground, not permanently attached to the ground, and usually two-sided, generally connected at the top and separated at the bottom.

 

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A-FRAME SIGN

 

Sign, Animated. A sign that uses moving or changing lights to depict action, movement, or the optical illusion of movement of part of the sign structure, sign, or pictorial segment, or including the movement of any illumination or the flashing or varying of light intensity to create a special effect or scene. Animated signs do not include electronic message signs.

Sign, Awning. An awning is a roof-like cover designed for protection from the weather or as a decorative embellishment, which projects from a wall or roof of a structure over a window, walkway, or door, with no supports that extend to the ground. An awning sign is a sign printed or displayed upon an awning.

 

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AWNING SIGN

 

Sign, Balloon. A sign or advertising device designed to be airborne or inflated and tethered to the ground or other structure. This includes any air-inflated signs and any signs that inflate and move via air inflation.

Sign, Canopy. A canopy sign is a sign printed, mounted, or installed upon a canopy. A sign canopy may be one of two types:

1. Canopy - Non-Structural. A roofed structure attached to a building, which is not integral to the structure, that is made of durable, weather-resistant material such as canvas, canvas-like material, nylon, or vinyl-coated fabric, placed to extend outward from the building and supported both by mountings on the structure wall and by supports that extend to the ground.

2. Canopy - Structural. A roofed structure constructed of permanent building materials, such as metal, brick, stone, wood or similar building materials, that is constructed as part of and attached to a building, and extends outward from the building and supported both by the structure and by supports that extend to the ground. Certain structural canopies may also be constructed freestanding accessory structures on the same lot with the principal use and/or structure.

 

 

CANOPY SIGN: NON-STRUCTURAL

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CANOPY SIGN: STRUCTURAL - ATTACHED

 

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CANOPY SIGN: STRUCTURAL - FREESTANDING

 

Sign, Flashing. A sign with an intermittent or sequential flashing light source used primarily to attract attention. Flashing signs do not include electronic message signs.

Sign, Freestanding. A sign that is placed on or supported by the ground, independent of the principal structure on the lot, designed with a monument base that is an integral part of the sign structure. There are three types of freestanding signs regulated by this Ordinance:

 

1. Freestanding Sign – Standard. A freestanding sign that identifies an establishment that is not specifically categorized as a residential subdivision freestanding sign or a multi-tenant retail center freestanding sign.

2. Freestanding Sign – Residential Subdivision. A freestanding sign used to identify a residential subdivision.

3. Freestanding Sign – Multi-Tenant Retail Center. A freestanding sign used to identify a commercial development with two or more tenants.

 

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FREESTANDING SIGN

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FREESTANDING SIGN

Sign, Ghost. A painted wall sign that remains from an earlier time or advertises the use of a building that provides evidence of the history of the use of the building or activities of the community. A ghost sign is not an off-premise sign.

Sign, Marquee. A sign that is a part of or attached to a marquee. Where designed as a changeable message, sign, the changeable message portion may be manually changed or electronically changed when permitted by this Code.

 

MARQUEE SIGN

 

Sign, Moving. A sign where the entire sign structure or a portion of which rotates, moves, elevates, or in any way alters position or geometry. A tri-vision sign where triangular prisms rotate inside a frame to show a new message and/or information are considered moving signs. Moving signs do not include clocks or barber poles.

Sign, Projecting. A sign that is attached to a rigid structure that extends more than 18 inches beyond the surface of the structure to which it is attached. A marquee sign is not considered a projecting sign.

 

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PROJECTING SIGN

 

Sign, Roof. A sign that is erected, constructed, or maintained on and/or extending above the roof structure or parapet of any building with the principal support attached to the roof structure.

 

ROOF SIGN

 

 

 

Sign, Wall.  A sign that is attached directly to an exterior wall of a building or dependent upon a building for support and projects 18 inches or less from the wall of a structure with the exposed face of the sign in a plane substantially parallel to the face of the wall. Window signs are not considered wall signs.

 

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WALL SIGN

 

Sign, Window. A sign that is attached to, placed upon, or printed on the interior or exterior of a window or door of a building, or displayed on the interior within two feet of a window intended for viewing from the exterior of such a building. A window sign may be either permanent or temporary. Shadowbox design within display windows, where the window display is designed with a background enclosure against which signs are mounted that blocks view into the establishment, is considered a window sign and the entire area of the shadowbox is subject to the maximum sign area limitation.

 

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WINDOW SIGN

 

Stacking Space. A space specifically designed and designated as a waiting area for vehicles patronizing a drive-through facility or service bay.

Standpipe. A rigid vertical or horizontal pipe to which fire hoses can be connected, which may be building, ground, or roof mounted.

Stoop. An exterior floor typically, constructed of stone, concrete, and/or masonry, with a finished floor elevation higher than the adjacent ground level, often with steps leading up to it, and utilized primarily as an access platform to a structure. A stoop may be roofed and designed with railings, but cannot be enclosed.

Street. A public or private right-of-way that affords a primary means of vehicular, and may include cyclist and pedestrian, access to abutting property, A street does not include alleys or driveways.

Structural Alteration. Any change, other than incidental repairs, which would prolong the life of supporting members of a structure, such as the addition, removal, or alteration of bearing walls, columns, beams, girders or foundations.

Structure. A combination of materials to form a construction for use, occupancy, or ornamentation, whether installed on, above, or below, the surface of land or water.

Substantial Repair/Rehabilitation. Substantial repair/rehabilitation occurs with any exterior change, other than routine exterior maintenance activities, that would prolong the life of the supporting members of a building. Routine exterior maintenance activities such as painting, tuckpointing, replacing trim in kind, railings in kind, or replacing other nonstructural architectural details in kind are not considered to constitute a substantial repair/rehabilitation unless the cost of exceeds 50% of the assessed building or appraised value.

Unified Control. The combination of two or more tracts of land wherein each owner has agreed that his tract of land will be developed under the same development approvals.

Use. The purpose or activity for which the land or structure is designed, arranged, or intended, or for which it is occupied or maintained.

Video Display Sign. A sign, or portion of a sign, that displays an electronic video, whether pre-recorded or streaming. This includes projection of an electronic video on a wall or other surface.

White Roof. A roof designed to deliver high solar reflectance, reducing heat transfer to the building and the ability to radiate absorbed, or non-reflected solar energy.

Yard. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Yard, Front. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Yard, Interior Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Yard, Corner Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Yard, Rear. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Yard, Reverse Corner Side. Defined in Section 17.02.040.

Zoning Lot. A lot or combination of lots within a single block, which is designated by its owner or developer to be used, developed, or built upon as a unit. A zoning lot may coincide with a lot of record or may be comprised of one or more lots of record.

Zoning Map. The map or maps that are a part of this Ordinance and which delineate the boundaries of all mapped zoning districts within the physical boundary of the City.

 

 

 

Section 17.02.040  Rules Of Measurement

This section provides the rules of measurement for the dimensional standards and locational characteristics within the Ordinance.

A.            Block and Blockface

1.     A block is a tract of land bounded by streets, or a combination of streets and railroad rights-of-way or municipal boundary lines.

2.      Blockface is measured as that portion of a block or tract of land facing the same side of a single street and lying between the closest intersecting streets.

 

BLOCK AND BLOCKFACE

Block & Blockface

 

B.            Build-To Dimensions

Certain dimensional requirements with the district require structures to be constructed at a build-to dimension. A build-to requirement is a boundary or alignment, parallel to a lot line, where a structure must be placed. This Ordinance includes three types of build-to dimensions:

1.     A build-to line (BTL) is a set building line on a lot, measured perpendicular from the applicable lot line, where a building line must be located. The building line must be located on the build-to line. Facade articulation, such as window or wall recesses and projections are not counted as the building line, which begins at the applicable building wall.

2.     A build-to zone (BTZ) is the area on a lot, measured perpendicular from the applicable lot line, where the building line must locate within the minimum and maximum range of setback provided. The building line must be located within the build-to zone. Facade articulation, such as window or wall recesses and projections are not counted as the building line, which begins at the applicable building wall.

3.     A build-to percentage specifies the percentage of the building line that must be located within a build-to line or build-to zone. (Build-to percentage is measured as a percentage of the total building façade, not lot width.)

 

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BUILD-TO LINE

 

 

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BUILD-TO ZONE

 

 

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BUILD-TO PERCENTAGE

 

 

The following are examples of how build-to lines (BTL) and build-to zones (BTZ) are applied. When the front setback BTL is indicated as 5’, the structure must be built at 5’ from the front lot line. When the front setback BTZ is indicated as 0’ to 10’, the structure must be built within that range, shown in the example below as 5’; the property owner may choose any setback within that range.

 

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C.                Building Coverage

That portion of the lot that is or may be covered by buildings and accessory structures.

D.                Building Height

1. Maximum building height is measured from grade (see Section 17.02.040.F) at each side of the building as follows:

a. The top of a flat roof, including structures designed with a decorative mansard roof concealing a flat roof.

b. The deck line of a mansard or gambrel roof.

c. The midpoint height between the eaves and the ridge in the case of a pitched roof.

d. Any dormers on the roof that extend past the roofline cannot exceed the maximum building height permitted in the district, as measured from the adjacent average grade, or its equivalent, to the top of the dormer.

2.     For the purposes of building height measurement, roof types are defined as follows:

a. Flat Roof: A roof that is not pitched and where the surface of the roof is generally parallel to the ground. A mono-pitched roof, also called a shed roof, is a single-sloping roof surface, and is also considered a flat roof.

b. Mansard or Gambrel Roof: A two-sided roof with two slopes on each side. The upper slope is positioned at a shallow angle, while the lower slope is steep. A gambrel roof has vertical gable ends, while a mansard roof is hipped at the four corners of the building.

c. Pitched Roof: A gable or hip roof having a slope or pitch of at least one foot rise for each four feet of horizontal distance in the direction of the slope or pitch of the roof. A hipped roof is sloped in two pairs of directions compared to the one pair of direction for a gable roof.

3.     The following structures or parts thereof are exempt from maximum height limitations, unless otherwise limited by any height restriction imposed by any airport authority, or other similar federal, state, or local authority.

a. Public utility poles, towers, and wires. Public utilities do not include wireless telecommunications, solar panels, and wind turbines unless operated by a government agency.

b. Water tanks and standpipes.

c. Building appurtenances such as chimneys, parapet walls, skylights, steeples, flag poles, smokestacks, cooling towers, elevator bulkheads, fire towers, monuments, water towers, stacks, stage towers, or scenery lofts, tanks, ornamental towers and spires, rooftop accessory structures, recreational facilities, necessary mechanical appurtenances, or penthouses to house mechanical appurtenances.

 

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BUILDING HEIGHT

E.            Caliper

Tree caliper is the diameter of a tree trunk, measured at four and one-half feet above the adjacent ground.

F.            Grade

The average of the finished ground level of each wall of a building measured vertically along the façade and averaged.

G.            Gross Floor Area (GFA)

The gross floor area (GFA) of a structure is the sum of the gross horizontal areas of all floors of the structure as measured from the exterior faces of the exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating two buildings.

H.          Impervious Surface Coverage

1. Impervious surface coverage is a measure of intensity of land use that represents the portion of a site that is occupied by structures, pavement, and other impervious surfaces that do not allow for the absorption of water into the ground. Maximum impervious surface of a lot is calculated as the percentage of all impervious surface area against the total area of the lot.

2.     When pervious paving is used, it is calculated at a reduced percentage of impervious coverage, as follows:

a. Pervious concrete and open grid paving systems are calculated as 50% impervious surface, provided that no barrier to infiltration is installed beneath the material. Open grid pavers must be installed on a sand base, without an impervious liner, to qualify.

b. Other types of pervious surfaces, such as permeable pavers, porous asphalt, or gravel-crete, are credited based upon field performance data and coefficients of permeability provided by the manufacturer.

I.              Lot

A lot is the basic development unit for determination of lot area, depth, and other dimensional regulations; or a parcel of land whose boundaries have been established by some legal instrument such as a recorded deed or recorded map and which is recognized as a separate legal entity for purposes of transfer of title. The following describes the types of lot configurations:

1.     An interior lot is a lot other than a corner or through lot, bounded by two interior side lot lines.

2.     A corner lot is a lot situated at the junction of, and abutting on, two or more intersecting streets.

3.     A through lot is a lot which fronts upon two parallel streets, or which fronts upon two streets which do not intersect at the boundaries of the lot. A through lot is also called a double frontage lot.

4.     A reverse corner lot is a corner lot where the side lot line adjoining a street is substantially a continuation of the front lot line of the first lot to its rear.

5.     A flag lot is platted so that the main building site area (the “flag”) is set back from the street on which it fronts and includes an access strip (the “pole”) connecting the main building site with the street.

 

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LOT

 

J.             Lot Area

The total area within the boundaries of a lot, excluding any street right-of-way, usually defined in square footage.

K.            Lot Depth

The distance from the front lot line to the rear lot line as measured from the midpoint of the front lot line to the midpoint of the rear lot line. In the case of triangular or similarly irregularly shaped lots, the rear lot line used to measure lot depth is a calculated line of ten feet in length entirely within the lot, parallel to and at a maximum distance from the front lot line.

L.            Lot Line

A line of record bounding a lot, as indicated on an approved, filed, and recorded subdivision plat, which divides one lot from another lot or from a public or private street or any other public or private space and includes:

1.     A front lot line is the lot line separating a lot from a street right-of-way. The front lot line of a corner lot is the shortest street lot line of a corner lot abutting a street. A front lot line for a through lot is both lot lines that abut a street.

2.     A rear lot line is the lot line opposite and most distant from the front lot line. In the case of triangular or similarly irregularly shaped lots, the rear lot line is a calculated line of ten feet in length entirely within the lot, parallel to and at a maximum distance from the front lot line.

3.     On a corner lot, the corner side lot line and reverse corner side lot line is perpendicular or approximately perpendicular to the front lot line and is the longer street abutting lot line of a corner lot.

4.     On an interior lot, the interior side lot line is perpendicular or approximately perpendicular to the front lot line and abuts an adjacent lot.

5.     A street lot line is any lot line separating a lot from a street right-of-way.

 

LOT AREA & LOT LINES

LOT DEPTH

 

M.           Lot Width

1.     For regular lots, lot width is the horizontal distance between the side lot lines measured at right angles to its depth along a straight line parallel to the required front setback, build-to line, or farthest build-to line comprising a build-to zone.

2.     For cul-de-sac lots, on those lots with a curved front lot line, lot width is measured as follows:

a. A line is drawn at the midpoint of the lot between the side lot lines, extending from the front lot line to the rear lot line.

b. Where the required front setback intersects the midpoint line at a right angle, a line is drawn perpendicular to the midpoint line.

c. Lot width is determined as the length of the line between side lot lines.

d. Where the side lot lines angle to increase width towards the rear, the required lot width measured at the required setback is 75% of the lot width required by the zoning district.

3.     For flag lots, lot width is measured at the required front setback as defined in this section.

 

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LOT WIDTH

 

N.           Separation Measurement

When uses are required to be measured a certain distance from another use or district, such separation distance is measured from a point of the lot line on which such use is proposed to be located to the nearest point on the lot line where the other use or district is located

O.            Sign Dimensions

1.          Calculation of Sign Area

a. The sign area of each sign is the total exposed surface devoted to the sign’s message, including all ornamentation, embellishment, symbols, logos, letters, characters, other figures, or frames, whether structural or decorative. The calculation of sign area does not include any supports or bracing. For channel letters or freestanding logos/symbols, the sign area is calculated as the customary, applicable mathematical formula for the total area of each square, circle, ellipse, rectangle, or triangle, or combination thereof, that encompasses each word, logo, image, background, and/or display.

b. Window area for the purpose of calculating maximum area of window signs is calculated as a continuous surface until divided by an architectural or structural element. Mullions are not considered an element that divides window area. Total window area is calculated as length times width of the window area. Only the individual letters or logos of the window sign shall be used in the calculation of surface area. The transparent film around the perimeter of the individual letters or logos comprising the window sign and used to affix the window sign to the interior or exterior of a windowpane or glass door shall be exempt from the area calculations, provided that such portion of the transparent film maintains 100% transparency of the window.

 

 

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SIGN AREA

 

SIGN AREA

 

 

2.     Measurement of Sign Height

For ground signs, sign height is measured as the vertical distance measured from the normal grade at the base of the sign to the highest point of the sign, including any decorative elements. Normal grade shall be construed to be the existing grade prior to construction or the newly established grade after construction, exclusive of any fill, berm, mound, or excavation solely for the purpose of locating the sign, whichever is lower.

 

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SIGN HEIGHT

3. Measurement of Vertical Clearance

For building-mounted signs, vertical clearance is measured as the vertical distance measured from the ground directly below the sign to the lowest point of the sign.

 

 

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VERTICAL CLEARANCE

 

4.     Determination of Number of Sign Faces

If the interior angle between two sign faces is 45° (degrees) or less, the sign area is computed as the area of one face only. If the angle between two sign faces is greater than 45° (degrees), the total sign area is computed as the sum of the areas of the two faces.

SIGN FACE

5.     Sign Setback

A required sign setback is measured from the applicable lot line to the closest component of the sign or sign structure.

 

SIGN SETBACK

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P.            Yards and Setbacks

                1.                 General Definition

a. A yard is the open space area between the building line of a principal building and the adjoining lot lines, exclusive of facade articulation, such as window or wall recesses and projections.

b. A required setback is the required minimum distance a principal building must be located from a lot line, which is unoccupied and unobstructed by any projections of a principal building, unless permitted by this Code.

i. A build-to zone or build-to line is considered a required setback.

ii. In the case of a build-to line it is where the principal building must be located.

iii. In the case of a build-to zone, it is the defined area (defined by minimum and maximum build-to lines) where the principal building must be located.

c. A setback may be equal to or lesser than a yard.

d. A setback is located along the applicable lot line for the minimum depth specified by the zoning district in which such lot is located.

 

2.     Front Yard and Front Setback

The front yard and front setback extend the full width of the lot between side lot lines measured perpendicular to the front lot line.

a. Front Yard: A front yard is located between a principal building line and the front lot line.

b. Front Setback: A front setback is the required minimum distance per the zoning district that a principal building must be located from the front lot line.

c. A front setback is measured from the right-of-way line.

d. Front setbacks on irregular lots are subject to the additional provisions:

i. On a lot with a radial (curved) front lot line, the required front setback, as measured from the right-of-way line follows the curve of the lot line.

ii. For flag lots, the front yard and setback is measured from the rear lot line of the lot that separates the flag portion of the lot from the street. For multiple flag lots that utilize a common drive, the front yard and setback may be measured from the lot line of the pole or access strip, as extended into the lot.

e. Where front yard averaging is permitted, the average front setback of the adjacent lots on either side of a lot may be used to establish the required front setback. Averaging is based on the two adjacent lots on either side or, in the case of a corner lot, the next two adjacent lots. In the case of a lot configuration where only one lot is available for averaging, the required front setback is that of the adjacent lot.

 

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FRONT YARD AVERAGING

 

 

3.     Interior Side Yard and Interior Side Setback

The interior side yard and interior side setback extend along the interior side lot line between the front and rear yard or setback, measured perpendicular to the interior side lot line.

a. Interior Side Yard: An interior side yard is located between a principal building line and the interior side lot line.

b. Interior Side Setback: An interior side setback is the required minimum distance per the zoning district that a principal building must be located from the interior side lot line.

c. For single-family semi-detached developments, the interior side yard and interior side setback are only applicable to the side of the unit not located on the lot line (no shared wall attachment to another unit). For townhouse developments, the interior side yard and interior side setback are only applicable to end units of the development.

4.     Corner Side Yard and Corner Side Setback

The corner side yard and corner side setback extend along the corner side lot line between the front yard or front setback and the rear lot line, measured perpendicular to the corner side lot line.

a. Corner Side Yard: A corner side yard is located between a principal building line and the corner side lot line.

b. Corner Side Setback: A corner side setback is the required minimum distance per the zoning district that a principal building must be located from the corner side lot line.

5.     Rear Yard and Rear Setback

The rear yard and rear setback extend between interior side lot lines, measured perpendicular to the rear lot line.

a. Rear Yard: A rear yard is located between a principal building line and the rear lot line.

b. Rear Setback: A rear setback is the required minimum distance per the zoning district that a principal building must be located from the rear lot line.

c. In the case of a corner lot, the rear yard and rear setback extend between the interior side lot line to the required corner side setback, measured perpendicular to the rear lot line.

6.       Reverse Corner Side Yard and Setback

The reverse corner side yard and setback extends along the corner side lot line between the front yard and the rear lot line, measured perpendicular to the corner side lot line. The corner side lot line adjoining a street is substantially a continuation of the front lot line of the first lot to its rear.

a. Reverse Corner Side Yard: A reverse corner side yard is located between a principal building and the corner side lot line.

b. Reverse Corner Side Setback: A reverse corner side setback is the required minimum distance per the zoning district that a principal building must be located from corner side lot line.

7.     Yard and Setback Requirements for Through Lots

For through lots, both the front and the rear required setbacks must meet the required front setback of the zoning district.

 

SETBACKS

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YARDS

 

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D.            Lots Rendered Nonconforming

If a lot of record existing on the effective date of this Ordinance was a conforming lot before the effective date of this Ordinance, but such lot does not meet all standards set forth in this Ordinance in the zoning district in which it is located, that lot is deemed a nonconforming lot of record and is controlled by the provisions of Chapter 17.15.

 

E.    Site Characteristics Rendered Nonconforming

If a site characteristic existing on the effective date of this Ordinance was conforming before the effective date of this Ordinance or any subsequent amendment to this Ordinance, but such site characteristic does not meet all standards set forth in this Ordinance in the zoning district in which it is located, that site characteristic is deemed a nonconforming site characteristic and is controlled by the provisions of Chapter 17.15.

 

F. Previously Issued Building Permits

If a building permit for a structure was lawfully issued prior to the effective date of this Ordinance, and remains active and in good standing, the structure may be completed in accordance with the plans on the basis of which the building permit was issued and may, upon completion, be occupied under a certificate of occupancy for the use originally intended.

 

G. Previously Granted Variances

All variance approvals granted prior to the effective date of this Ordinance remain in full force and effect, unless such variance is no longer needed after the effective date. The recipient of the variance may proceed to develop the property in accordance with the approved plans and all applicable conditions. However, if the recipient has failed to act on the variance before the approval expires, including any approved periods of extension, then the provisions of this Ordinance govern.

H. Previously Granted Special Uses

1.     All special uses granted prior to the effective date of this Ordinance, but where the use has not yet commenced, remain in full force and effect. The recipient of the special use may proceed to use the property in accordance with the approved plans and all applicable conditions.

2. However, if the special use becomes a permitted use in the district as of the effective date, such special use approval is no longer needed.

3.     If the recipient has failed to act on the special use before the approval expires, including any approved periods of extension, then the special use is null and void.

I. Previously Approved Planned Developments

1. Previously approved TND Traditional Neighborhood Development Districts remain in effect and continue to control the development of land that is subject to such approval. These previously approved planned development districts are considered planned unit developments as of the effective date of this Ordinance. Any amendments to existing planned developments are subject to the amendment procedures of planned unit developments unless specific amendment process has been included as part of the approval.

2. Previously approved PID Planned Institutional Districts remain in effect and continue to control the development of land that is subject to such approval. These previously approved planned development districts are considered the S-IC Institutional Campus District as of the effective date of this Ordinance. Any amendments to existing planned developments are subject to the amendment procedures of the S-IC District unless specific amendment process has been included as part of the approval.

 

J. Pending Applications

1.     A variance, special use, or design review application that has been deemed complete and has been scheduled for a public hearing or meeting, as applicable, is subject to the Ordinance requirements in effect on the date the application was deemed complete.

2.     A building permit that has been submitted and deemed complete is subject to the Ordinance requirements in effect on the date the application was deemed complete.

 

Section 17.01.050  Severability

If any section, paragraph, subdivision, clause, sentence, or provision of this Ordinance is adjudged by any court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, that judgment does not affect, impair, invalidate, or nullify the remainder of this Ordinance. The effect of the judgment is confined to the section, paragraph, subdivision, clause, sentence, or provision immediately involved in the controversy in which judgment or decree was rendered.

 

 

CHAPTER 17.03. ZONING DISTRICTS AND ZONING MAP

Section 17.03.010  Zoning Districts

Section 17.03.020 District Zoning Map

Section 17.03.030 Annexed Land

Section 17.03.040 Exemptions for Rights-Of-Way and Public Utilities

 

Section 17.03.010  Zoning Districts

In order to carry out the purpose and intent of this Ordinance, the City is divided into the following zoning districts:

 

A.          Residential Districts

                R-1 Single-Family Residential Zoning District

                R-2 Single-Family Residential Zoning District

                R-3 Single-Family and Two-Family Residential Zoning District

                R-3C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District

R-4 Single-Family and Two-Family Residential Zoning District

R-4C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District

                R-MF Multi-Family Residential Zoning District

                R-MHP Residential Manufactured Home Park Zoning District

B.        Commercial Districts

                C-T Commercial Transitional Zoning District

                C-1 Neighborhood Commercial Zoning District

                C-2 Corridor Commercial Zoning District

                C-3 General Commercial Zoning District

                C-OP Commercial Office Park Zoning District

C-D Downtown Zoning District

                C-V Village of East Davenport Zoning District

C-E Elmore Corners Zoning District

C.              Industrial Districts

                I-1 Light Industrial Zoning District

                I-2 Heavy Industrial Zoning District

                I-MU Industrial Mixed-Use Zoning District

D.            Special Purpose Districts

                S-AG Agricultural Zoning District

                S-OS Open Space Zoning District

                S-IC Institutional Campus Zoning District

               

Section 17.03.020  District Zoning Map

A.               Location of Districts

1.     The location and boundaries of the zoning districts established by this Ordinance are set forth in the Official Zoning Map, as periodically amended. The Official Zoning Map, and all the notations, references and other information shown thereon are incorporated into, and made part of, this Ordinance.

2.     It is the intent of this Ordinance that the entire area of the City is included in the zoning districts established by this Ordinance. Any land lying within the City, but not shown on the Official Zoning Map as being included within a district, is classified as the S-AG District.

B.      Interpretation of Boundary Lines

1.     Right-of-Way Lines

Where zoning district boundary lines coincide with streets, alleys, highways, expressways, easements, or railroads, the boundary line is construed to be the centerline of the right-of-way.

2.               Property Lines

Where zoning district boundary lines coincide with a recorded property line, the property line is construed to be the boundary line of the district.

3.     Scaled Lines

Where the district boundary lines do not coincide with a right-of-way line or recorded property line, the district boundary is determined by measuring such boundary line(s) by using the map scale as provided on the Official Zoning Map.

4. Clarification of Boundary Lines

The Zoning Administrator will decide any interpretations of zoning district boundary lines, where the application of this section leaves doubt as to the boundary between two zoning districts.

 

Section 17.03.030  Annexed Land

Any territory annexed into the City is automatically, upon annexation, zoned as the S-AG Agricultural District, until the territory is rezoned.

 

Section 17.03.040  Exemptions for Rights-Of-Way and Public Utilities

A.            The provisions of this Ordinance do not apply to land located within public rights-of-way.

B.            The following utility structures are exempt from the provisions of this Ordinance and permitted in any district: poles, wires, cables, conduits, vaults, laterals, pipes, mains, hydrants, valves, and water supply wells.

C.            The provisions of this Ordinance do not apply to public utilities.

D.            Public utilities do not include wireless telecommunications, amateur HAM radio towers, solar panels, or wind turbines, unless operated by a government agency.

 

CHAPTER 17.04. RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS

Section 17.04.010  Purpose Statements

Section 17.04.020 Uses

Section 17.04.030 Dimensional Standards

Section 17.04.040 R-MHP District Standards

Section 17.04.050 R-3C and R-4C District Design Standards

Section 17.04.060 General Standards of Applicability

 

Section 17.04.010  Purpose Statements

A.            R-1 Single-Family Residential Zoning District

The R-1 Single-Family Residential Zoning District is intended to accommodate the lowest-density single-family neighborhoods within the City of Davenport, exhibiting a predominantly semi-suburban development pattern of large lots and generous yards.

B.            R-2 Single-Family Residential Zoning District

The R-2 Single-Family Residential Zoning District is intended to accommodate low-density single-family neighborhoods of a more urban character than the R-1 District. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-2 District.

C.            R-3 Single-Family and Two-Family Residential Zoning District

The R-3 Single-Family Residential Zoning District is intended to accommodate residential neighborhoods in the City of Davenport consisting of single-family and two-family homes in a moderately dense urban development pattern. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-3 District.

D.            R-3C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District

The R-3C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District is intended to preserve and protect Davenport’s moderately dense, centrally located, established urban residential neighborhoods. Standards of the R-3C District are intended to ensure that new development is complementary to the existing developed character of these neighborhoods. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-3C District.

E.            R-4 Single-Family and Two-Family Residential Zoning District

The R-4 Single-Family and Two-Family Residential Zoning District is intended to accommodate residential neighborhoods in the City of Davenport consisting of single-family and two-family homes in a dense urban development pattern. The R-4 District may also serve as a transitional district between Davenport’s single-family and two-family neighborhoods and more intense uses within the City. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-4 District.

F.             R-4C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District

The R-4C Single-Family and Two-Family Central Residential Zoning District is intended to preserve and protect Davenport’s dense, centrally located, established urban residential neighborhoods. Standards of the R-4C District are intended to ensure that new development is complementary to the existing developed character of these neighborhoods. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-4C District.

G.            R-MF Multi-Family Residential Zoning District

The R-MF Multi-Family Residential Zoning District is intended to accommodate a high-density neighborhood environment characterized by a mixture of housing types including single-family dwellings, two-family dwellings, townhomes and multi-family dwellings. Limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods may be permitted in the R-MF District.

H.            R-MHP Residential Manufactured Home Park Zoning District

The R-MHP District is intended to accommodate manufactured home parks, which are areas containing manufactured home sites arranged on a large tract, typically under single ownership, and designed to accommodate manufactured homes.

 

Section 17.04.020  Uses

A.            Chapter 17.08 lists permitted, special, and temporary uses for the residential districts.

B.            In the R-3, R-3C, R-4, and R-4C Districts, two-family dwellings are allowed as follows:

1.     New construction of a two-family dwelling is a permitted use.

2. Conversion of a structure from a single-family dwelling into a two-family dwelling is a special use.

 

Section 17.04.030  Dimensional Standards

 

A.            Table 17.04-1: Residential Districts Dimensional Standards establishes the dimensional standards for the residential districts. These regulations apply to all uses within each district unless a different standard is listed for a specific use. See Section 17.02.040 for measurement methodologies.

B.            A house court design for single-family and/or two-family dwellings must comply with the dimensional standards of Section 17.08.030.N.

C.            R-MHP District standards are found in Section 17.04.040.

 

Table 17.04-1: Residential Districts Dimensional Standards

SF = Single-Family // SF-SD = Single-Family Semi-Detached // 2F = Two-Family // TH = Townhouse // MF = Multi-Family

 

R-1

R-2

R-3

R-3C

Bulk

 

 

 

 

Minimum Lot Area

20,000sf

SF: 10,000sf

SF-SD: 10,000sf/du

SF: 7,500sf

SF-SD: 4,000sf/du

2F: 8,500sf

Non-Residential: 10,000sf

SF: 7,500sf

SF-SD: 4,000sf/du
2F: 8,500sf

Non-Residential: 10,000sf

Minimum Lot Width

100’

SF: 60’

SF-SD: 60’/du

SF & 2F: 60’

SF-SD: 30’/du

Non-Residential: 75’

SF & 2F: 50’

SF-SD: 25’/du

Non-Residential: 75’

Maximum Building Height

35’

35’

35’

35’

Maximum Building Coverage

25%

35%

35%

35%

Maximum Impervious Surface

40%

50%

60%

Non-Residential: 70%

60%

Non-Residential: 70%

Setbacks

 

 

 

 

Minimum Front Setback

30’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

30’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

25’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

25’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

Minimum Interior Side Setback

7’

7’

7’

5’

Minimum Corner Side Setback

25’

20’

15’

15’

Minimum Reverse Corner Side Setback

30’

30’

25’

25’

Minimum Rear Setback

30’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

30’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

25’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

25’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

 


Table 17.04-1: Residential Districts Dimensional Standards

SF = Single-Family // SF-SD = Single-Family Semi-Detached // 2F = Two-Family // TH = Townhouse // MF = Multi-Family

 

R-4

R-4C

R-MF

Bulk

 

 

 

Minimum Lot Area

SF: 6,000sf

SF-SD: 3,500sf/du

2F: 7,000sf

Non-Residential: 10,000sf

SF: 4,000sf

SF-SD: 2,500/du

2F: 5,500sf

Non-Residential: 10,000sf

SF, 2F: 6,000sf

SF-SD: 2,500/du

TH, MF: 1,500sf/du

Non-Residential: 10,000sf

Minimum Lot Width

SF & 2F: 50’

SF-SD: 25’/du

Non-Residential: 75’

SF & 2F: 40’

SF-SD: 25’/du

Non-Residential: 75’

SF, 2F: 50’

SF-SD: 25’/du

TH: 20’/du

MF: 80’

Non-Residential: 75’

Maximum Building Height

35’

35’

SF, 2F, TH: 35’

MF: 70’

Maximum Building Coverage

35%

40%

Non-Residential: 35%

SF: 40%

SF-SD & 2F: 50%

TH, MF: 65%

Maximum Impervious Surface

60%

Non-Residential: 70%

60%

Non-Residential: 70%

SF: 60%

SF-SD & 2F: 70%

TH, MF: 75%

Non-Residential: 75%

Setbacks

 

 

 

Minimum Front Setback

20’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

15’ or average of front setbacks, whichever is less

25’

Minimum Interior Side Setback

5’

 

10% of lot width, or 5’, whichever is less

In no case shall an interior side setback be less than 4’

10’ - When abutting a residential district, structures over 45’ in height require 1’ additional setback for each 3’ in height over 45’

Minimum Corner Side Setback

15’

10’

20’

Minimum Reverse Corner Side Setback

20’

15’

25’

Minimum Rear Setback

20’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

15’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

25’ or 20% of site depth, whichever is less

 

Section 17.04.040  R-MHP DISTRICT STANDARDS

Development in the R-MHP District is limited to manufactured home parks, which are subject to the following standards.

A.        Dimensional Standards

Table 17.04-2: R-MHP District Dimensional Standards establishes the dimensional standards for manufactured home parks in the R-MHP District. Standards are provided for the manufactured home park development overall and for individual manufactured home sites within the park.

 

Table 17.04-2: R-MHP District Dimensional Standards

 

Manufactured Home Park

Manufactured Home Site

BULK

Minimum Lot/Site Area

10 acres

4,500sf

Minimum Lot/Site Width

250’

45’

Maximum Building Height

--

20’

Minimum Separation Between Sites

--

15’ as measured from the walls of manufactured homes

SETBACKS

Minimum Front Setback

50’

Dedicated internal street: 20’

Private access drive: 10’

Minimum Interior Side Setback

50’

10’

Minimum Corner Side Setback

50’

10’

Minimum Rear Setback

50’

10’

 

B.            Design and Operation Standards

1. Manufactured home parks must meet the following design standards:

a. All manufactured home parks require site plan review. 

b. The perimeter yard of a manufactured home park requires a buffer area of 15 feet at the furthest point in the required setback from the abutting lot line, and must contain the following:

(1) A mix of shade and evergreen trees planted at an average of one tree for every 50 linear feet of yard width. These shade and evergreen trees may be clustered to allow for access points or to maximize the screening effect, conditioned on approval of the landscape plan.

(2) Two ornamental trees may be substituted for one shade tree for up to 25% of required trees.

(3) Shrubs must be planted and space sufficiently to form a continuous linear hedgerow at plant maturity.

(4) The remainder of the buffer area must be planted with low groundcover, seed, or sod.

2. Manufactured home sites within parks must meet the following design standards:

a. The boundaries of each manufactured home site must be clearly marked.

b. There must be at least 15 feet between the sides of manufactured homes. Bay windows, porches, canopies or other projections are considered sides or ends of a mobile home when determining these requirements. Such projections, such as porches and canopies, must be constructed of fireproof material that meets the requirements of the Building Code.

c. Each manufactured home site must have a concrete slab or runway for the manufactured home to set on, and be of a size large enough to accommodate a manufactured home in such a fashion that the concrete will extend at least one inch around the walls of the manufactured home on all sides.

d. There must be a concrete slab alongside of each manufactured home site of at least 12 feet by 30 feet to be used as a parking space for the occupants of the manufactured home. If a canopy is to be used over the area designated as car storage, it must be of fire-resistant material and is allowed only at the rear end of each carport area.

e. All manufactured homes must be designed with skirting that is constructed of noncombustible or fire-resistant material that meets the requirements of the building code.

f. The front entry of a manufactured home should be a dominant feature of a manufactured home, using features such as porches, raised steps and stoops with roof overhangs, or decorative railings.

 

Section 17.04.050  R-3C and R-4C District Design Standards

In addition to the use standards for dwelling types located in Chapter 17.08, the following design standards apply to the R-3C and R-4C Districts. The standards below are applicable to construction of a new dwelling, construction of a new garage and/or carport, and/or an addition to an existing dwelling that exceeds 25% of the building footprint of the structure as it was on the effective date of this Ordinance.

A.               Building Massing and Orientation

1.     The scale of new construction must maintain compatibility with adjacent homes and the overall character of the surrounding area.

2. Architectural elements within the design must be in proportion to the overall structure.

3.     The scale of additions to existing homes must maintain compatibility with the size of the existing structure and its architectural elements, as well as with the size of adjacent homes and the overall character of the surrounding area.

4. Foundation height must maintain compatibility with adjacent homes, provided adequate drainage can be achieved.

5. Dwellings must be oriented toward the residential street, and must connect to the sidewalk via walkways perpendicular to the street.

6.     Where served by an alley or rear service drive, dwellings must orient garages or parking pads for access from the alley or rear service drive.

B.            Façade Design

1.     All façades that face a street must have articulation in the form of windows, doors, or other significant architectural features that are projected or recessed to create shadow and visual interest.

2.     The number and size of façade articulations must be scaled to the size of the façade to balance a home’s compatibility within the neighborhood with its own unique character.

3. Additions to existing homes must continue the architectural vocabulary established by the original home, and must be informed by the overall character of the surrounding area.

4.     Front porches are encouraged, to add interest and scale to the front of a home. Where provided, porches must maintain compatibility with adjacent homes.

5.     The front entry to a home must be a prominent feature, and must be located on the front façade.

C.       Fenestration

1.     The design of a home’s fenestration must reflect a consistent rhythm, repeating elements or groups of elements in a consistent manner across a home’s story and between stories. Individual elements may vary in size, but must relate to each other proportionally.

2. Elements of fenestration must relate to each other visually by sharing design features such as vertical or horizontal alignment, depth, or ornamentation such as muntins, mullions, sills, trim, lintels, etc.

3. Façades facing onto immediately adjacent properties must design their fenestration to respect the privacy of neighbors. This may be addressed through the height, size, or proportion of windows, the exclusion of balconies, and the use of opaque or translucent materials.

D.            Roof Form

1.     Roof forms must be varied through a combination of structural articulations such as gables, hips, valleys, ridges, and saddles that complement the roof form of adjacent homes.

2.     Roof pitch should be consistent for all sloped roof faces, and should maintain compatibility with adjacent homes and the overall character of the surrounding area.

3. Definition is encouraged, through integration of architectural features such as dormers, eyebrows, chimneys, and deep eaves, which create shadows across the façade of a structure and create visual interest.

E.               Building Materials

Building materials for new homes, or additions to existing homes must maintain compatibility with adjacent homes and the overall character of the surrounding area.

1.        Primary Building Materials

Primary building materials are the dominant component of a home’s exterior walls, composing 75 to 90 percent of each building face.

a. No more than two primary building materials are permitted for new homes, not including foundation.

b. For additions to existing homes, no more than two primary building materials are permitted, provided that the total number of primary building materials for the overall structure, including addition, is not more than two.

c. Color, texture, or finish changes within any category of materials count as separate primary building materials.

d. Permitted primary building materials include:

i. Brick and stone

ii. Wood or simulated wood

iii. Vinyl siding

iv. Aluminum Siding

v. Stucco

e. Building materials not listed above may be considered on a case-by-case basis, and will be evaluated based upon such factors as durability, maintenance, architectural or design intent, and neighborhood context.

2.     Accent Materials

Accent materials are secondary components of a home’s exterior walls, typically used to provide architectural detail or visual interest to a façade. Accent materials may not compose more than 25% of each building face.

a. For new construction and additions to existing homes, if one primary building material is used (not including a foundation), a minimum of two but no more than three accent materials are permitted for the overall structure, including any addition.

b. For new construction and additions to existing homes, if two primary building materials are used (not including a foundation), a minimum of one but no more than two accent materials are permitted for the overall structure, including any addition.

c. Color, texture, or finish changes within any category of materials count as separate accent materials.

d. Permitted accent materials include:

i. Brick and stone

ii. Wood or simulated wood

iii. Architectural metal cladding

iv. Concrete masonry units

v. Stucco

e. Accent materials not listed above may be considered on a case-by-case basis, and will be evaluated based upon such factors as durability, maintenance, architectural or design intent, and neighborhood context.

3.        Roofing Materials

a. Roofing materials should complement the architectural style of a home.

b. A consistent application of one roofing material is required for all roof areas visible from the right of way or any neighboring property.

c. Color, texture, or finish changes within any category of materials listed below count as separate roofing materials.

d. Permitted roofing materials include the following:

i. Dimensional asphalt shingles

ii. Wood shingles and shakes

iii. Slate

iv. Terra Cotta

v. Ceramic tile

vi. Metal tiles or standing seam

e. Roofing materials not listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis, and will be evaluated based upon such factors as durability, maintenance, architectural or design intent, and neighborhood context.

4.  Application of Building Materials

a. Building materials should be consistently applied on all exterior faces of new homes. Elevations of different materials or colors are not permitted, such as brick or stone front facades, with vinyl siding on side and rear elevations.

b. Visual balance should be maintained on each face of a structure. For both new construction and additions to existing homes, if multiple primary building materials are used on the overall structure, those that appear heavier, or that carry more visual weight should be placed toward the bottom of a structure, with materials that appear lighter placed above.

c. Frequent or irrational changes in building materials should be avoided. Change of materials should occur with prominent architectural features or changes in wall plane.

d. Where materials change with a change in wall plane, the material change should occur on the inside corner, not the outside edge.

 

R-3C AND R-4C DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

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R-3C AND R-4C DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

R-3C%20-4C%20In%20context

 

 

Section 17.04.060  General Standards of Applicability

A.    Site Development Standards

See Chapter 17.09 for additional on-site development standards and requirements, such as exterior lighting, accessory structures and uses, and permitted encroachments.

B.            Off-Street Parking and Loading
See Chapter 17.10 for off-street parking and loading standards and requirements.

C.    Landscape

See Chapter 17.11 for landscape, buffering, and screening standards and requirements.

D.    Signs

See Chapter 17.12 for standards governing signs.

 

CHAPTER 17.05. COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS

Section 17.05.010  Purpose Statements

Section 17.05.020 Uses

Section 17.05.030 Dimensional Standards

Section 17.05.040 Design Standards

Section 17.05.050 C-D District Standards

Section 17.05.060 C-V District Standards

Section 17.05.070 C-E District Standards

Section 17.05.080 General Standards of Applicability

 

Section 17.05.010  Purpose Statements

A.            C-T Commercial Transitional Zoning District

The C-T Commercial Transitional Zoning District is intended to accommodate low intensity limited office, service, and retail uses that may serve as a transition between residential areas and more intensely developed commercial or light industrial areas of the City. Low intensity mixed-use is allowed.

B.            C-1 Neighborhood Commercial Zoning District

The C-1 Neighborhood Commercial Zoning District is intended to provide for commercial uses that predominantly serve the needs of nearby residential neighborhoods, and that are compatible in scale and character with the surrounding residential area. Low intensity mixed-use is encouraged.

C.            C-2 Corridor Commercial Zoning District

The C-2 Corridor Commercial Zoning District is intended to address the commercial corridors that are primarily oriented toward a mix of retail, personal service, and office uses along the minor arterials and collectors in the City. The C-2 District accommodates auto-oriented development – both individual businesses and retail centers – and mixed-use development, with the intent of improving the pedestrian environment along Davenport’s commercial corridors. 

D.            C-3 General Commercial Zoning District

The C-3 General Commercial Zoning District is intended to accommodate higher-intensity commercial development within the City of Davenport that serves both local and regional markets. The C-3 District addresses medium- and large-scale development that may generate considerable traffic and typically requires significant off-street parking. Higher density residential uses are also allowed to facilitate a mixed-use orientation where appropriate.

E.            C-OP Commercial Office Park Zoning District

The C-OP Commercial Office Park Zoning District is intended to accommodate larger office developments, office parks, and research and development facilities, which may include limited indoor light industrial uses with no outside impacts. The district is oriented toward larger-scale complexes that may include ancillary services for employees such as personal services, restaurants, and retail establishments. District standards are intended to guide the development of campus-like environments, and include provisions for orientation of structures around plazas or public spaces, and the creation of a cohesive appearance.

F.             C-D Downtown Zoning District

The C-D Downtown Zoning District is intended to accommodate the unique development environment of downtown Davenport. The District is intended to reinforce and enhance the existing character of downtown as a point of regional focus, a destination for culture, sports, and entertainment, and a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly mixed-use environment.

G.            C-V Village of East Davenport Zoning District

The C-V Village of East Davenport Zoning District is intended to preserve and enhance the smaller-scale, historic character of the Village of East Davenport, and to ensure future development is compatible with the unique historic and architectural character of the area.

H.  C-E Elmore Corners Zoning District

The C-E Elmore Corners Zoning District is intended to implement the vision contained in the Elmore Corners Area Plan through the application of site and building design standards that ensure quality, compatible, and coordinated development within the area. 

 

Section 17.05.020  Uses

A.            Chapter 17.08 lists permitted, special, and temporary uses for the commercial districts.

B.            In the C-V District, only 35% of a blockface can be in the use “bar.” This is calculated as a percentage of the number of buildings along a blockface. Where a structure maintains an outdoor seating area, such seating area is counted as part of the building.

 

Section 17.05.030  Dimensional Standards

A.            Table 17.05-1: Commercial Districts Dimensional Standards establishes the dimensional standards for the commercial districts, with the exception of the C-D, C-V, and C-E Districts. The dimensional standards for development in the C-D, C-V, and C-E Districts are found in Sections 17.05.050, 17.05.060, and 17.05.070 respectively, below. These regulations apply to all uses within each district unless a different standard is listed for a specific use.

B.            In the C-T District, new non-residential development is limited to the maximum gross floor area indicated in Table 17.05-1. Any structures existing as of the effective date of this Ordinance are exempt from this limitation. Additional gross floor area may be permitted if, during site plan review, it is found that the development meets the following standards:

1.     The development maintains the privacy of adjacent residential lots through techniques such as decreased height, additional landscape and screening measures, building massing and design to mitigate adverse impacts of noise and lighting, and increased setbacks above those required from adjacent residential lots.

2.     Building design elements incorporate pedestrian-scale features, such as awnings and storefront windows.

3.     The design of the site’s circulation system provides adequate and safe access for both motor vehicles and alternate modes of transportation, including pedestrians and bicyclists. The design minimizes potentially dangerous traffic movements and points of conflict between vehicles and pedestrians or bicyclists.

C.            See Section 17.02.040 for measurement methodologies.

 

Table 17.05-1: Commercial Districts Dimensional Standards

 

C-T

C-1

C-2

C-3

C-OP

Bulk

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum Lot Area

10,000sf

None

None

20,000sf

20,000sf

Minimum Lot Width

60’

None

None

80’

70’

Maximum Gross Floor Area of Nonresidential

5,000sf unless meeting the standards of Section 17.05.030.B

None

None

None

None

Maximum Building Height

35’

45’

45’

Nonresidential: 50’

Mixed-Use: 70’

45’

Setbacks

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum Front Setback

Build-to zone of 0’ to 20’

Build-to zone of 0’ to 15’

None

25’

20’

Front Setback Build-To Percentage

70%

70%

None

None

None

Minimum Interior Side Setback

None, unless abutting a residential district then 20’

None, unless abutting a residential district then 10’

None, unless abutting a residential district then 10’

10’, unless abutting a residential district then 20’

15’

Minimum Corner Side Setback

Build-to zone of 0’ to 15’

Build-to zone of 0’ to 10’

10’

20’

Build-to zone of 0’ to 20’

Corner Side Setback Build-To Percentage

60%

60%

None

None

60%

Minimum Rear Setback

15’, unless abutting a residential district then 25’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

None, unless abutting a residential district then 15’ or 20% of lot depth, whichever is less

None, unless abutting a residential district then 15’

10’, unless abutting a residential district then 25’

25’

 

Section 17.05.040  Design Standards

The following design standards apply to new construction, substantial repair or rehabilitation of the exterior façade of an existing structure meant to remedy damage or deterioration, and additions to an existing structure in the commercial districts, with the exception of the C-D, C-V, and C-E Districts. Design standards for development in the C-D, C-V, and C-E Districts are found in Sections 17.05.050, 17.05.060, and 17.05.070 respectively, below. Only those standards that relate to the specific repair, rehabilitation action, or addition apply. These standards do not apply to interior remodeling.

 

A.       Commercial Districts Design Standards

Table 17.05-2: Commercial Districts Design Standards establishes the design standards for the commercial districts. In the table, a “•” indicates that the standard is applicable in the district indicated. The absence of a “•” indicates that the standard does not apply to the district.

 

Table 17.05-2: Commercial Districts Design Standards

 

C-T

C-1

C-2

C-3

C-OP

Façade Design

 

 

 

 

 

Building façades that abut a public right-of-way, excluding alleys, must not contain blank wall areas that exceed 40 linear feet, measured parallel to the street.

 

Building façades in excess of 100 linear feet that abut a public right-of-way, excluding alleys, must include a repeating pattern with no less than two of the following elements: color change, texture change, building material change, or a wall articulation change of no less than 2 feet in depth or projection, such as a reveal, pilaster, or projecting rib. All elements must repeat at intervals of no more than 40 linear feet.

 

Buildings with façades over 150 feet in length must incorporate wall projections or recesses, or changes in wall plane a minimum of two feet in depth a maximum of every 75 linear feet.

 

 

 

 

All buildings must have a public entrance from the sidewalk along the primary building frontage. Public entrances must be visually distinctive from the remaining portions of the façade.

 

Building materials and visual elements used on the façade of the primary building frontage must continue on all building façades that abut a public right-of-way (excluding alleys) and/or the lot line of a residential district.

 

Large expanses of highly reflective wall surface material and mirror glass on exterior walls are prohibited.

Fenestration Design

 

 

 

 

 

The ground floor of a façade abutting a public right-of-way (excluding alleys) must maintain a minimum transparency of 50%, measured between two and ten feet in height from grade.

 

 

 

The ground floor of a façade abutting a public right-of-way (excluding alleys) must maintain a minimum transparency of 35%, measured between two and ten feet in height.

 

 

 

 

Upper floors of a façade abutting a public right-of-way (excluding alleys) must maintain a minimum transparency of 15% of the wall area of the story.

 

 

Roof Design

 

 

 

 

 

Rooflines over 100 linear feet in building length must contain variation, and incorporate a major focal point feature, such as a dormer, gable, or projected wall feature. An element of variegation on the roofline must occur at intervals of no more than 75 linear feet.

 

Parapet walls must feature three-dimensional cornice treatments or other shadow-creating details along their tops to provide visual interest.

 

Any roof that is visible from a public right-of-way must be shingle or colored standing seam metal roofing.

 

Green roof, blue roof, and white roof designs are encouraged.

Reflective roof surfaces that produce glare are prohibited, except for solar panels or white roofs intended to radiate absorbed or non-reflected solar energy and reduce heat transfer to the building.

Entrance Design

 

 

 

 

 

Public entrances and primary building elevations must be oriented toward public streets. Main entrances to the buildings must be well defined.

 

 

 

 

Entries to office or guest facilities must address the street, with direct access to office or guest facilities from street frontages and parking areas.

 

 

 

 

Multi-Tenant Commercial Center and Office Park Site Design

 

 

 

 

 

Sites must be designed to ensure safe pedestrian access to the commercial center from the public right-of-way, and safe pedestrian circulation within the development.

 

 

A cohesive character must be established through the use of coordinated hardscape (paving materials, lighting, street furniture, etc.) and landscape treatments within the development.

 

 

Any outlot buildings must meet the minimum transparency requirements of the district on all facades except where such transparency on part or all of a facade would reveal preparation and/or storage areas. Prominent entrances must be oriented toward both the street and the interior parking lot.

 

 

 

 

Commercial centers must provide definition along the street frontage by located part of the center or outlot buildings within 0’ to 25’ of the front lot line for a minimum of 30% of the frontage. The center or any outlot buildings may be placed within a required setback to comply with this standard.

 

 

 

 

In multi-building complexes, a distinct visual link must be established between various buildings through the use of architectural features or site design elements such as courtyards, plazas, landscape, and walkways to unify the project.

 

 

 

 

Developments should provide a pedestrian link to adjacent commercial uses to provide safe pedestrian access between the site and commercial uses outside the development.

 

 

 

 

 

B.               Building Material Restrictions

In commercial districts (excluding the C-D, C-V, and C-E Districts), the following building materials are prohibited on any façade facing a public right-of-way (excluding alleys) or any façade that abuts the lot line of a residential district. However, such materials may be used as decorative or detail elements for up to 25% of the façade, or as part of the exterior construction that is not used as a surface finish material.

1.     Plain concrete block

2.  Corrugated metal

3.   Aluminum, steel or other metal sidings (does not apply to C-1 and C-2 Districts)

4.       Exposed aggregate (rough finish) concrete wall panels

5.     T-111 composite plywood siding

6.     Plastic

7.     Vinyl

../../../../../Illustrations/5.0%20Commercial%20Districts/C-1.jpg

C-1 DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

 

 

../../../../../Illustrations/5.0%20Commercial%20Districts/C-2.jpg

C-2 DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

 

 

../../../../../Illustrations/5.0%20Commercial%20Districts/C-3.jpg

C-3 DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

 

 

MULTI-TENANT COMMERCIAL CENTER SITE DESIGN STANDARDS

 

C-OP DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS

 

 

I-OP

 

Industrial%20Site%20Design

 

 

Section 17.05.050  C-D District Standards

A.               Purpose Statement

The C-D District is intended to accommodate the unique development environment within Downtown Davenport. Development in Downtown should be oriented toward reinforcing the area as a point of regional focus and strengthening its position as a center of office, finance, retail, and governmental activities. Additionally, the C-D District standards are intended to:

1.     Add to the downtown’s appeal as a visitor, cultural, sports and entertainment center.

2.   Encourage downtown residential development in a variety of housing types.

3. Accommodate a variety of active uses and enhance the walkability and pedestrian orientation of Downtown.

4.     Ensure high-quality design that maintains and enhances the aesthetic appeal of Downtown.

B.            C-D District Dimensional Standards

Table 17.05-3: C-D District Dimensional Standards establishes the dimensional standards for Downtown. These regulations apply to all uses within the district unless a different standard is listed for a specific use.

 

Table 17.05-3: C-D District Dimensional Standards

 

C-D

Bulk

 

Minimum Lot Area

None

Minimum Lot Width

None

Maximum Building Height

None

Minimum Building Height

24’

Setbacks

 

Front Setback

0’-10’ build-to zone

Required Build-to Percentage

80%

Interior Side Setback

None

Corner Side Setback

0’-10’ build-to zone

Rear Setback

None

 

C.            C-D District Design Standards

Development in the C-D District is subject to design review per Section 17.15.070, and must be designed in accordance with the City of Davenport’s adopted Downtown Design Guidelines and Downtown Davenport Streetscape Improvement Plan.

 

17.05.060  C-V District Standards

A.               Purpose Statement

The C-V District is intended to ensure that new development in the Village of East Davenport is compatible with the unique cultural and historic character of the area. To that end, the C-V District standards contain contextual controls and a series of design considerations that address height, width, proportion, and relationship to the street, as well as architectural considerations such as roof and cornice form, visual composition, rhythm, fenestration and articulation, and materials.

B.            C-V District Dimensional Standards

Table 17.05-4: C-V District Dimensional Standards establishes the dimensional standards for the Village of East Davenport. These regulations apply to all uses within the district unless a different standard is listed for a specific use.

 

Table 17.05-4: C-V District Dimensional Standards

 

C-V

Bulk

 

Minimum Lot Area

None

Minimum Lot Width

None

Maximum Building Height

45’