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TOWN COUNCIL

MEETING MINUTES

VIA ZOOM

april 20, 2021

Normand Albert 2021

Kasie Kolbe 2021

Allen Ward 2021

 Mark Lunt 2022

Donald Fellows 2022

Jeffrey Ganong 2022

Fern Larochelle 2023

 

CALL TO ORDER.  The Chairman, Allen Ward, called the meeting to order and led the pledge of allegiance to the flag at 7:00 PM.

 

ROLL CALL.  Members present were Councilors Ward, Albert, Kolbe, Lunt, Larochelle, Ganong (arriving at 7:30 PM), and Fellows.  Also present were Diane Barnes, Town Manager; Twila Lycette, Town Clerk; Dennis Douglass, CEO/HO; Ryan McGee, Police Chief; Brett Richardson, Economic & Community Development Director;  Kayla Tierney, Finance Director; Finance Committee Members, Heather Ward, Noly Lopez, Curtis Lunt, Dan Leeman; Traci Austin, School Committee Chairman; Allen Ouellette, School Department/Facilities Director;  Western Maine Transportation Services (WMTS), Craig Zurhorst; RHR Smith, Ron Smith; and from the Maine Department of Transportation/Bridge Program, Devan Eaton, Project Manager. 

 

WORKSHOP

 

A.          AUDIT PRESENTATION

 

Mr. Smith reported Lisbon’s financial statements indicate the town has financially improved its financial condition to the tune of around $600,000 as of June 30, 2020.  This brings the town total for undesignated surplus up from $2.5 or $2.6 million to $3.2 million.  The School was at about $900,000.  He said where we like to see the town and school departments undesignated surplus at, given the town is very complex and operates a lot of stuff, is somewhere around 30, 60, to 90 days’ of the town’s total operating budget.  The value on that would be about $1.4 million dollars, $2.8 million dollars, to $4.2 million dollars.  He said between the town and school, the audit shows the town lands right on exactly that amount.  He said the current undesignated amount at $3.2 million dollars is somewhat north of 90 days, but given this economy with the uncertainty of COVID and not knowing where the economy will go moving forward, this is right where the town needs to be. 

 

Mr. Smith said Lisbon’s revenues came in right on budget.  He said revenues were within $18,000 from the budgeted amount, which is as close as you can get for a town this size.  Property Tax was down $80,000 from the previous year.  The fund balance grew because on the expense side, Lisbon did not spend all of its appropriations going into 2020.  He said this strategy is how Lisbon has been able to maintain its financial level at where it is at right now.  

 

Mr. Smith said the Water Department is healthy.  The sewer department expansion is going well.  He reported the town has money tucked away to where it needs to be tucked away.  That undesignated balance right now allows the Town the ability to mitigate a lot of the uncertainty and complexity the future holds for Lisbon.  He said if he were to give Lisbon a grade, he would have to say it is around an A- to a B+.  He said Lisbon received the highest unmodified report and highest opinion they could offer.  There were really no issues.

 

Mr. Smith pointed out the management letter reconciliation issues; however, there were posting and beginning balances related to the long-term project of cleaning up loose ends from the transition year to new software.  He indicated that the software change over to MUNIS took a monumental effort to accomplish and that Council may not realize the magnitude of this transition.  Now that Lisbon is in Year-3, the town is seeing progress, clean-up efforts are almost complete, and Lisbon is turning the corner.  He reported the town now has a good reconciliation process and the school department is catching up, demonstrating more consistency with reconciliations not more than a two or three month gap.  He said it is nice to see the comradery between the town and school; this is very different from what it was a few years ago, like night and day.  He indicated as we move into the next audit year, the town should see an even better report as more transitioning progress has been made, which was good to see.    

 

B.           CODES

 

Dennis Douglass presented the following Codes Budget:

 

12024500 Code Enforcement

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

12024500

50102

Department Head

            79,468.00

12024500

50201

Unemployment Costs

                     96.00

12024500

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

               2,753.00

12024500

50210

MEPERS - Employer Share

               8,185.00

12024500

50220

Health Insurance

            17,723.00

12024500

50230

FICA Employer Costs

               6,079.00

12024500

50301

Office Supplies

                  250.00

12024500

50302

Operating Supplies

               3,500.00

12024500

50306

Postage

                  100.00

12024500

50352

Cell Phone/Allowances

                  420.00

12024500

50375

Gas

                            -  

12024500

50401

Professional Development

                  200.00

12024500

50402

Dues and Memberships

                            -  

12024500

50501

Vehicle Repairs

                            -  

12024500

50624

Mapping & Microfilming

               1,000.00

Total 12024500 Code Enforcement

          119,774.00

 

Mr. Douglass reported his department needed 5 or 6 new filing cabinets.  The drawers are a little hard to pull out and each drawer is stuffed full.  He indicated these cabinets were in the building long before he arrived.  He said they share filing cabinets with the Assessing Department.  The public is allowed to look at this information; lenders and realtors need information from these files so they help themselves and then staff places these files back into the drawers, so they are used quite often.

 

Councilor Ward pointed out these cabinets are a one-time purchase.  He requested the amount to purchase filing cabinets be removed from the Codes Budget and added to the list to be funded through the assigned fund balance.  There were no objections noted and no other changes mentioned.      

 

C.           TOWN BUILDINGS

Item taken out of order.

 

Mrs. Barnes presented the Town Buildings budget as follows:

 

12051500 Town Buildings

 

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

FY22 Changes from presented budget on 3.16.2021 Increase (Decrease)

FY22 Proposed Budget presented on 3.16.2021

FY22 Projected Department Budget Appropriation

50104

Non-Supervisory wages

     11,249.00

                    -  

     11,249.00

           11,249.00

50201

Unemployment Costs

             90.00

                    -  

             90.00

                   90.00

50202

Workers compensation insurance

           556.00

                    -  

           556.00

               556.00

50210

Maine State retirement

                    -  

                    -  

                    -  

                        -  

50230

FICA taxes

           860.00

                    -  

           860.00

               860.00

50302

Operating supplies

       6,000.00

                    -  

       6,000.00

            6,000.00

50451

Contracted Professional Service

                    -  

    (6,000.00)

       6,000.00

            6,000.00

50510

Electricity

     48,000.00

                    -  

     48,000.00

          48,000.00

50511

Water usage fees

       2,200.00

                    -  

       2,200.00

            2,200.00

50512

Telephone

       9,000.00

                    -  

       9,000.00

            9,000.00

50513

Sewer Expense

           800.00

                    -  

           800.00

               800.00

50514

Heating Fuel

     13,000.00

                    -  

     13,000.00

          13,000.00

50515

Natural Gas

     29,000.00

                    -  

     29,000.00

          29,000.00

50520

Building Expense

     20,000.00

  (50,000.00)

     70,000.00

        170,000.00

50536

R&M: Equipment

     30,000.00

                    -  

     30,000.00

           30,000.00

50549

R & M Buildings

     17,000.00

                    -  

     17,000.00

           17,000.00

Total 12051500 Town Buildings

   187,755.00

  (56,000.00)

   243,755.00

        343,755.00

 

Mrs. Barnes said the biggest change in this budget is the Contracted Profession Services line that originally had $6,000 in there so that we would have money for a clerk of the works to do larger projects.  That is a onetime expense to assist with the transfer station so it was moved onto the list for unassigned funds.  She reported under Building Expenses the town raised $70,000 this year and almost $50,000 of that was for the new roof at the fire station so this line went back to the $20,000 it typically would have.  Any other items for Town Buildings will be funded through the unassigned fund balance.

 

Councilor Larochelle asked if this was realistic and would cover maintenance issues.  Mrs. Barnes said we have had Patriot’s Mechanical look at the air exchange system quite a few times.  Councilor Larochelle asked how much would it cost to take care of the air exchange system.  Mrs. Barnes replied around $500,000.  If the town does not need to borrow the money, it will not require a referendum.  Mrs. Tierney confirmed this is on the CIP for a task to be done in 2023 for $500,000 as debt or bond.  Councilor Larochelle asked if this project could be broken down into segments to completed in stages.  He said if we do not repair it, it could end up one day being a real big issue, like the Town Office roof.  Mrs. Barnes said she could check with Patriot’s Mechanical or Seaman’s to see if it could be done in stages.  Councilor Ward suggested Mrs. Barnes obtain a number and add it into this budget to help phase in the air exchanger project.

 

Councilor Larochelle said he thought Mr. Douglass had an estimate already for the air exchanger system.  Councilor Ward said Council would have to pay attention to this item because the town pays $9,000 per exchanger and the town has purchased four in the last five years; there is a legitimate need here.  Councilor Ward said he could support getting this done for a reasonable cost.  Mrs. Barnes agreed to work on obtaining estimates and looking into getting this done in stages if possible.  Councilor Ward requested this item to be added to the list for future discussion, if for nothing else than to see where the town stands on this issue because 2023 will be here soon and it will have to be addressed.

 

Councilor Lunt recommended hiring someone to monitor building maintenance needs.  Councilor Albert said he agreed.  He said he could understand why having the department heads monitor their building maintenance needs on a short-term basis is a fix right now, but how can that be effective in the long run, because this type of work  requires a person with subject matter expertise.  We certainly do need support for capital improvement projects as well as with building maintenance projects.  He indicated if there was someone in house would that someone have enough time to take on all these town projects.  He said all our town employees wear a lot of different hats.  Is there a resource that is untapped, should Council look at hiring a point person with subject matter expertise to be the expert on all the buildings here?  He said he was not a fan of hiring someone outside.  He suggested putting this on the list to discuss later.  Councilor Fellows said he was in favor to investigate further the need to hire someone.  Councilor Ward indicated Mrs. Barnes was looking into finding a clerk of the works to oversee the transfer station project and asked Mrs. Barnes if she could see if this person could do an assessment of the town’s facilities.  He indicated Lewiston is having a hard time keeping up with its facilities maintenance issues, too.  Councilor Fellows recommended the town develop a checklist with the help of an outside company.  Councilor Larochelle suggested hiring a facilities manager for one or two days a week, dedicated to the cause, overseeing maintenance projects, which could be a great part-time opportunity for someone.  Mr. Lunt said he remembers back when the town hired a Town Engineer to do this work, which worked out very well.  He suggested hiring a contracted part-timer as well to do this work.  Councilor Ward requested adding this position to the list for further discussion.

 

D.    BOARD OF APPEALS

 

Mr. Douglass presented the Board of Appeals budget as follows:

 

12021500 Appeals Board

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

12021500

50104

Non-Supervisory

 

12021500

50108

Elected Officials

                  751.00

12021500

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

                       2.00

12021500

50230

FICA Employer Costs

                    58.00

12021500

50301

Office Supplies

                    50.00

12021500

50306

Postage

                    50.00

12021500

50307

Advertising

                  250.00

12021500

50401

Professional Development

                  140.00

Total 12021500 Appeals Board

              1,301.00

 

Mr. Douglass said this budget is the same each year.  Councilor Ward asked about victualer inspections.  Mr. Douglass said the state inspects establishments every few years.  He said he does food establishments annually in Lisbon and it takes quite a bit of time. 

 

There were no changes for this budget.   

 

E.     PLANNING BOARD

 

Mr. Douglass presented the Planning Board budget as follows:

 

12021600 Planning Budget

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

12021600

50104

Non-Supervisory

                5,000.00

12021600

50108

Elected Officials

                5,000.00

12021600

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

                     32.00

12021600

50210

MEPERS - Employer Share

                   515.00

12021600

50230

FICA Employer Costs

                   765.00

12021600

50301

Office Supplies

                   250.00

12021600

50306

Postage

                   150.00

12021600

50307

Advertising

                   500.00

12021600

50401

Professional Development

                   400.00

12021600

50451

Contracted Professional Service

                5,000.00

Total 12021600 Planning Board

              17,612.00

 

Mr. Douglass reported the Contracted Professional Services line for $5,000 is for in depth ordinance writing and planning work AVCOG might charge the town.  Councilor Lunt said this budget had $10,000 in that line last year.  Mrs. Barnes indicated that $10,000 has not been spent.  She explained that Mr. Richardson has a degree in Planning and that he has been able to do some planning work for the town this year.  She said she moved $5,000 from this line into Economic Development.  She recommended Council approve the Economic Development Director’s reclassification for an increase in pay to include the planning position.  This amount should be adequate to cover planning needs.  Mr. Leeman said Mr. Douglass does a good job with planning so wouldn’t this stay under Mr. Douglass’s Department.  Mr. Lunt said this budget was initially $20,000, then $10,000, and now it is going to be $5,000.  He said Mr. Douglass does a great job, but any amount is a contingency.  Councilor Ward recommended encumbering $10,000 at the end of the year because we would have otherwise contracted out the work Mr. Richardson has been doing, so if encumbered it can be available next year if needed.  Councilor Lunt said Council should expect this line to fluctuate from year to year. 

 

Councilor Lunt said he was concerned about cutting the Contracted Professional Service line, because we have solar to work on; Lisbon is not ahead of the ball.  He suggested being careful about asking volunteers to help here.  Councilor Ward asked if $10,000 was a true need.  Councilor Larochelle said there was the possibility of needing some of that for ordinance writing.  He recommended leaving money in this budget for planning.  Mr. Lunt said using the Economic Development Department for planning would be an experiment.  Councilor Ward said what is missing is can he get everything done.  Councilor Albert agreed with compensation for his Planning Degree, but suggested creating the scope of what is needed first, being plan-full and mindful that is it a possibility.

 

Councilor Fellows pointed out the $20,000 initially paid for a contracted town planner, and it was lowered to $10,000 when the contracted town planner was eliminated.  He said it is hard to believe the town will need to spend over $5,000 for professional services, but he was okay with encumbering what is left in the Contracted Professional Services line this year. 

 

 

F.      ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

Mr. Richardson presented the Economic Development Budget as follows:

 

17070500 Economic Development

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

17070500

50102

Department Head

             65,975.00

17070500

50201

Unemployment Costs

                    96.00

17070500

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

                  212.00

17070500

50210

MEPERS - Employer Share

               6,796.00

17070500

50220

Health Insurance

               3,045.00

17070500

50230

FICA Employer Costs

               5,047.00

17070500

50301

Office Supplies

                          -  

17070500

50302

Operating supplies

               4,200.00

17070500

50306

Postage

                  300.00

17070500

50307

Advertising

               5,000.00

17070500

50352

Cell Phone/Allowances

                  695.00

17070500

50401

Professional employee training

               3,500.00

17070500

50402

Dues and Memberships

               2,250.00

17070500

50406

AVCOG Dues

               9,625.00

17070500

50412

Meal allowance

                  525.00

17070500

50413

Mileage/ travel reimbursement

               1,050.00

17070500

50670

Moxie Festival Donation

 

Total 17070500 Economic Development

        108,316.00

 

 

Council Ward mentioned this was the same budget as last year, except for the position reclassification.  He recommended adding the position reclassification to the list for future discussion.  Mrs. Barnes said the program coordinator funds come from the Moxie Fund, not from taxation.  She said TIF funds are used to offset this budget. 

 

G.    TOWN CLERK

 

Mrs. Lycette presented the Town Clerk budget as follows:

 

12022500 Clerk

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

12022500

50102

Department Head

                     64,792.00

12022500

50104

Non-Supervisory

                     33,780.00

12022500

50140

Overtime

                       2,300.00

12022500

50130

Temporary/seasonal

                       7,000.00

12022500

50201

Unemployment Costs

                          248.00

12022500

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

                          347.00

12022500

50210

MEPERS - Employer Share

                     10,390.00

12022500

50220

Health Insurance

                     21,365.00

12022500

50230

FICA Employer Costs

                       8,252.00

12022500

50301

Office Supplies

                       2,000.00

12022500

50306

Postage

                       1,500.00

12022500

50307

Advertising

                          800.00

12022500

50308

Printing

                       3,200.00

12022500

50352

Cell Phone/Allowances

                          420.00

12022500

50401

Professional Development

                          700.00

12022500

50402

Dues and Memberships

                          600.00

12022500

50412

Meals and Lodging

                            50.00

12022500

50413

Mileage/ travel reimbursement

                          100.00

12022500

50451

Contracted Professional Service

                          600.00

12022500

50455

Professional Services

                       8,800.00

12022500

50536

R&M: Equipment

                       2,800.00

Total 12022500 Clerk

                170,044.00

 

Mrs. Lycette said changes included the addition of an overtime line to cover taking and transcribing minutes, along with the extra hours needed at Election times.  She indicated cuts were made in Professional Development, meals and lodging, and mileage reimbursement since online learning is affordable and available.  Councilor Ward asked for an explanation on Professional Services.  Mrs. Lycette said this line covers vote tabulators, programming, codification, hosting town ordinances online, and the OnBoard database for boards and committees.  She said the Town Manager removed $13,750 previously from this line for book restoration (listed in the CIP) to be funded through the unassigned fund balance.   

 

H.    GENERAL ASSISTANCE

 

Mrs. Barnes presented the General Assistance Budget as follows:

 

13031000 General Assistance

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

13031000

50102

Department Head

                                -  

13031000

50104

Non-Supervisory

                      5,000.00

13031000

50201

Unemployment Costs

                                -  

13031000

50202

Workers Comp Insurance

                           16.00

13031000

50210

MEPERS - Employer Share

                         515.00

13031000

50230

FICA Employer Costs

                         383.00

13031000

50301

Office Supplies

                           50.00

13031000

50306

Postage

                         100.00

13031000

50352

Cell Phone allowance

                         365.00

13031000

50401

Professional Development

                         500.00

13031000

50440

General Assistance

                    25,000.00

Total 13031000 General Assistance

                 31,929.00

 

Mrs. Barnes said the General Assistance Department operates out of her office, that Mrs. LeClair is the GA Caseworker that takes clients during office hours and after hours when needed.  She explained that the Non-Supervisory line was for overtime incurred for time after 40 hours.  She commented Lisbon typically processes around 6 cases a month, some of which are repeat clients and can be handled by phone.  Councilor Larochelle confirmed this translates to about 6 hours a month.  Councilor Ward requested the $5,000 stipend be moved from the Non-Supervisory line into an overtime line.  

 

I.   MISC & COMMUNITY SERVICE

 

Mrs. Barnes presented the Miscellaneous and Community Services Budget as follows:

 

16062000 Other Public Services

ORG

OBJ

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION

FY22 Projected Managerial Budget Appropriation

16062000

50442

Transportation services

               42,000.00

16062000

50650

Historical Society

                 2,000.00

16062000

50651

LACO

                 1,000.00

16062000

50652

Memorial Day

                 1,800.00

16062000

50653

MMA

                 8,074.00

Total 16062000 Other Public Services

             54,874.00

 

Craig Zurhorst, from WMTS reported there were exciting changes on the horizon.  The Blue Line commuter bus that runs from Lewiston/Auburn to Bath will be taking over the commuter part and a smaller WMTS bus will be used for around town, but this will not change the amount Lisbon will contribute.  This new run might help Springworks and other large employers.  Ridership is going well with 3,509 commuter rides last year and 1,400 shopper riders.  The bus will make four runs a day instead of five, but it will stop in Topsham daily, too, and into Lewiston/Auburn, of course. 

 

Councilor Larochelle asked about where residents can find the bus routes and pick up locations and time.  Mr. Zurhorst said their website has a printable brochure and the route map available.  He indicated he could send the information to the town to post on its website as well and apologized for not getting this information over to Lisbon after it had been updated.  He mentioned Positive Change Lisbon offered to promote the service, too. 

 

Councilor Ward explained that this shows Council that Lisbon is a destination for leisure.  He said he had no recommended cuts.

 

 

GOOD NEWS & RECOGNITION

 

Councilor Fellows said he had the privilege of attending the ribbon cutting ceremony for Isabelle Grace last Friday, along with several other representatives form the town.  Lisa and Kaylee just opened at 143 Lisbon Street.  He said that was a very nice event, that she ran a few basket raffles, and handed out gift certificates from local businesses.  He wished them both much success.

 

Councilor Larochelle congratulated Mrs. Barnes and Chief McGee on the generator again.  He said the power went out this morning and a report from one employee indicated when it came back on it was seamless and not even noticeable.

 

PUBLIC HEARING – NONE

 

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION & RESPONSE FOR AGENDA ITEMS - NONE

 

CONSENT AGENDA

 

VOTE (2021-87) Councilor Albert, seconded by Councilor Kolbe moved to approve the following consent agenda items:

 

A. Municipal Accounts Payable Warrants totaling $ 481,824.87

B.  Municipal Payroll Warrants - None

C.  School Accounts Payable Warrants totaling $ 90,683.65

D. School Payroll Warrants totaling $ 390,109.30

E. Council Minutes of March 30 and April 6, 2021

F. The following Renewal Mobile Home Parks:

 

1. Worumbo Park

2. Worumbo Estates

3. Davis Street Park

4. Sabattus Creek Park

5. Ridge Road Park

6. St. Ann’s Park

7. Blue Ridge Properties for 76 Lisbon Street

8. Colonial Gardens

9. Gendron’s

10. Grimmel’s

11. Avery Street Park

12. Whispering Pines

13. Town & Country

14. Brookwood Court

 

G.  Outdoor Flea Market Itinerant Vendor Permit for Riverside Flea Market

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe, and Fellows.  Nays - None.  Order passed - Vote 6-0.

 

COUNCIL ORDERS, RESOLUTIONS, & ORDINANCES

 

TRI-COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH MOU

 

INTRODUCTION:  Chief McGee reported the Lisbon Police Department would like to form a new partnership with Tri-County Mental Health in Androscoggin County.  Chief McGee worked with Tri-County Mental Health’s Chief Executive officer Catherine Ryder on providing drug-counseling resources to Lisbon residents that are experiencing severe drug dependencies and have possibly overdosed.

 

Chief McGee said that Tri-County Mental Health has a new 40-hour position, that this person can respond to Drug Overdoses with Lisbon Police Officers, and the position is funded completely through Tri-County Mental Health in Lewiston.  This position, based out of Lewiston, is able to respond with Lisbon Officers for active overdoses.  In the event they cannot respond right off, this person will be able to go with Lisbon Police Officers on follow-ups and provide drug-counseling resources.

 

Chief McGee explained this partnership provides direct support to Lisbon residents who are facing severe drug addictions and provides them with local resources to get help with their drug addiction.  It is also important to note that Tri-County Mental Health can provide counseling services to someone that does not have money or insurance and can secure funding to help these people.

 

Chief McGee requested Council approve the attached Memorandum of Understanding between the Lisbon Police Department and Tri-County Mental Health for Overdose Prevention through this Intensive Outreach program.  The MOU allows Tri-County Mental Health workers to ride in Lisbon Police Cruisers with Lisbon Officers to provide additional resources to the residents of Lisbon at no cost.

 

VOTE (2021-88) Councilor Larochelle, seconded by Councilor Kolbe moved to approve the Tri-County Mental Health Memorandum of Understanding between the Lisbon Police Department and Tri-County Mental Health for Overdose Prevention through this Intensive Outreach program. 

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe, Ganong and Fellows.  Nays - None.  Order passed - Vote 7-0.

 

LISBON FALLS & VILLAGE AREA WAYFINDING SIGNAGE

 

INTRODUCTION:  Mr. Richardson reported on December 8, 2020, Lisbon’s Town Council approved the design and development of wayfinding signage for Lisbon’s village areas, and allocated $4,000 from the Town’s Downtown Fund for production and installation following Council approval of the signage designs.

 

Mr. Richardson explained there is general recognition for the need for wayfinding signage in Lisbon.  Lack of adequate parking was a key discussion topic during a public meeting on September 28 at the MTM Center to introduce the community to the Maine Community Foundation-funded entrepreneurship initiative and to gather feedback on the Main Street closure for outdoor dining, Moxie Plaza. 

 

In follow-up to the public meeting, 14 village area businesses responded to a survey between October 21 and October 27.  Key findings include:

 

79 percent of responders believe there is a shortage of public parking

70 percent of responders believe that there is a lack of adequate wayfinding signage to guide customers to available parking

 

Mr. Richardson said the Lisbon’s Public Works Department is currently constructing new parking lots that add +/- 45 new parking spaces in the Village area, including at the Worumbo site, off Davis Street, and on Booker Street.   New wayfinding signage will make the most of the upcoming investment in the new parking lots by assisting visitors and customers to locate available spots.  Wayfinding signage also offers the opportunity to attract travelers on Route 196 to visit local businesses by offering a welcoming and visually cohesive invitation to stop and learn about all that Lisbon has to offer.  ECD has identified the need for 12 wayfinding signs at the following locations:  School Street & Route 196, School Street & Route 125, Union Street & Route 196, Main Street & Route 196, Davis Street & Route 196, Booker & Union Streets, Main & Maple Streets, Main & Goddard Streets, Municipal lot off Main Street, and at the Worumbo site entrance near the corner of Routes 196 & 125.  The signs will range from 2.5’ x 2’ to 4’ x 4’.  Final designs are included in the Council packet for review.  The designs have been shared with the Lisbon Development Committee and the entrepreneurship working group for general approval.

 

Mr. Richardson requested Council approve the attached wayfinding signage designs and locations for printing and installation in the designated locations.

 

COUNCILOR COMMENTS:  Councilor Ward pointed out the packet contained pictures of these wayfinding signs.  Mr. Richardson said the 2’ by 2’ signs with the small letter P are warning signs to let individuals know that ahead is a bigger lot for parking.  He indicated he had a few different options with arrows for different directions in case they are needed.  Councilor Larochelle said Council just needs to approve the designs at this time.  Mr. Richardson explained how the entrepreneur group, LDC, Moxie Commerce (the branding marketing group), and staff came up with the design for the color scheme, art works, and message itself as powered by Moxie, or the tag line that demonstrates Lisbon’s entrepreneurial spirit or attitude.  Moxie is a grittiness, a tenaciousness, which resonated with everyone during these conversations so that is what is being presented.  Councilor Ward pointed out that Lisbon cannot endorse the soda or do anything commercially for an endorsement on that soda. 

 

Mr. Richardson said the smaller signs do not have room enough to put the Powered by Lisbon message.  He said he would work with the Public Works Director to ensure these are all placed in the right spot.

 

VOTE (2021-89) Councilor Albert, seconded by Councilor Fellows moved to approve the wayfinding signage designs presented for printing and installation in the designated locations as follows:

 

School Street & Route 196, School Street & Route 125, Union Street & Route 196, Main Street & Route 196, Davis Street & Route 196, Booker & Union Streets, Main & Maple Streets, Main & Goddard Streets, Municipal lot off Main Street, and at the Worumbo site entrance near the corner of Routes 196 & 125.

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe, Ganong and Fellows.  Nays - None.  Order passed - Vote 7-0.

 

 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT CAPITAL RESERVE REQUEST

RELINE TRACK

 

INTRODUCTION:  Mrs. Austin said the current balance in the School’s Capital Reserve Fund is $260,150 and the following request is to utilize an amount not to exceed $10,250 to cover the cost to reline the track.  On Monday, April 12, 2021, the Lisbon School Committee voted 4-0 to request authorization from the Council to utilize an amount not to exceed $10,250 to cover the cost to reline the track.  The quote from Maine Tennis and Track is in the Council packet.  She explained that during their public hearings they agreed to follow the maintenance recommendations, so this is the first benchmark, which is to reline the track.   

 

COUNCILOR COMMENTS:  Councilor Larochelle asked what the 2nd benchmark was.  Mr. Ouellette said resurfacing is next.  Mrs. Austin said resurfacing the track is in the CIP.  Mr. Ouellette said resurfacing the track today would cost around $70,000, but its due in 3 to 4 years so that’s estimated then to be around $90,000.

 

Councilor Albert pointed out resurfaced the track in will extend the life of the track.  Mrs. Tierney reported the CIP indicates the Lisbon High School track has a life expectancy of 20-years.

 

VOTE (2021-90) Councilor Larochelle, seconded by Councilor Fellows moved to grant permission to the School Department to utilize an amount not to exceed $10,250 to cover the cost to reline the track.

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe, Ganong and Fellows.  Nays - None.  Order passed - Vote 7-0.

 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT CAPITAL RESERVE REQUEST  

REPLACE THE ROOF AT SUGG MIDDLE SCHOOL

 

INTRODUCTION:  Mrs. Austin said the current balance in the School’s Capital Reserve Fund is $260,150 and the following request is to utilize an amount not to exceed $249,900 to cover the cost to replace the roof at the Philip W. Sugg Middle School.  On Monday, April 12, 2021, the Lisbon School Committee voted 4-0 to request authorization from the Council to utilize an amount not to exceed $249,900 to replace the roof at the Philip W. Sugg Middle School.

 

COUNCILOR COMMENTS:  Councilor Ward indicated he asked Mrs. Barnes to check into the limits and what needs to go to voters for approval.  Mrs. Barnes reported the Charter change back in 2016 went from $100,000 to $250,000 and specifically talks about a lease or borrowing and not if you are paying for something out right.  She said this type of a project would not even fall under this regulation, because the school is not doing a lease purchase or bonding. 

 

VOTE (2021-91) Councilor Larochelle, seconded by Councilor Albert moved to grant permission to the School Department to utilize an amount not to exceed $249,900 to cover the cost to replace the roof at the Philip W. Sugg Middle School.

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe, Ganong and Fellows.  Nays - None.  Order passed - Vote 7-0.

 

OTHER BUSINESS

 

A.     COUNCIL COMMITTEE REPORTS

 

1.School: Councilor Albert indicated he had nothing new to report.

 

2.Planning:  Councilor Fellows said the Planning Board met last week to approve a modified rear lot subdivision, solar application on Frost Hill, modifications to Grimmel’s Mobile Home Park, and are working on the adult use marijuana and solar farm ordinances.

 

3.LDC: Councilor Fellows said Mr. Richardson showed the group some renditions for the Worumbo Park.  They should be available for the public mid-May.

 

4.Conservation Commission:  Councilor Ward indicated this committee is working on enhancing parking at Beaver Park, tree harvesting, and dealing with invasive species.

 

5.Recreation:  Councilor Albert said an Event Coordinator has been hired.  The ponds are now stocked with trout and bass at Beaver Park.

 

6.County Budget:  Councilor Ward mentioned there was an article in the news about the county’s bond question.

 

7.Library: Councilor Lunt said he had nothing new to report.

 

8.Water Commission: Councilor Fellows indicated he had nothing new to report.

 

9.Finance Committee: Councilor Albert pointed out the Finance Committee is meeting with the Council for now working on budgets.

 

B.      TOWN MANAGER’S REPORT

 

Mrs. Barnes stated she is working with Time Warner to update the Maps in Lisbon to identify the areas where there is no service.  She said stimulus and broadband funds would be available soon.  She is obtaining estimates for the cost to bring service to those areas. 

 

Mrs. Barnes said Olver Associates and L. P. Poirier & Sons, Inc. would be going to the Village Street/Rt.196 area on Friday to walk the Sidewalk Project to give her an idea of when they would be able to do the work.

 

C.      FRAZIER BRIDGE CULVERT REPLACEMENT PROJECT

 

Item Taken Out Of Order after Consent Agenda.

 

Mr. Eaton reported the State held a public forum last fall to gather input on what to do with the existing culvert.  He said afterwards they progressed forward with the design for a culvert replacement project.  This project is scheduled to be advertised in the fall of 2021 or winter, probably early December.  He mentioned they would need to close the road for 45 days during the summer of 2022.  The existing structure is approximately 50+ years old and in poor condition.  The current structure is a steel arch on what is referred to as “timber grillage,” which is just rods that keep the steel arch from falling out of shape.  This is a difficult structure to perform stage construction on because of the condition of the existing timbers, which can unravel or unzip very quickly creating a roadway failure.  Closing the road is a much cheaper cost effective way of doing this and much safer.  Plans are available now, which show the project limits and the detour routes vehicles would utilized during construction.

 

Councilor Albert said the traffic pattern has been somewhat frustrating for folks who come through here in the summertime.  He explained that Council would like to ensure there is no bottleneck all of a sudden because of this interruption to those traffic flows.  Mr. Eaton said he would be catching traffic with a significant sign package that they would put up around in the surrounding areas and roadways appropriately signing the detoured route.  These signs will hopefully catch traffic before they ever get to that highway project.  It will be coordinated with other work in the area and hopefully not be conflicting with other signage being put up, he said.  Environmental permitting regulates the window of opportunity this work must be done within, which is July through September.  He said Mrs. Barnes wanted them to avoid impacting school busses and things like that as much as possible, which is why the work would be done during the summer.  During the public process, one resident stated that farm machinery uses that roadway during the month of June for haying, which they can avoid because timing wise they would not start a road closure until July.    

 

Councilor Larochelle pointed out the two busiest hours during the day (3:30 PM to 5:30 PM) when traffic piles up getting onto Route 196 from School Street. He asked if the state had thought about putting up a temporary signal there.  Mr. Eaton explained they are only diverting existing vehicles, not new vehicles, and that there is no plan for a traffic signal at this point.  Mr. Eaton mentioned the state tries to keep heavy vehicles off from town streets, like Wing, whenever possible, which is why they are detouring traffic onto School Street, since it’s a State Aid Road and State funds are used to repair it; it is built for heavier traffic.

 

 

D.     DEPARTMENT HEAD WRITTEN REPORTS - none

 

APPOINTMENTS – NONE

 

COUNCILOR COMMUNICATIONS – NONE

 

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION & RESPONSE FOR NEW ITEMS – none

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION – NONE

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

VOTE (2021-92) Councilor Albert, seconded by Councilor Kolbe moved to adjourn at 8:38 pm.  

 

Roll Call Vote:  Yeas – Albert, Lunt, Larochelle, Ward, Kolbe and Ganong.  Nays - Fellows.  Order passed - Vote 6-0.

 

 

 

 

__________________________________

Twila D. Lycette, Council Secretary

Town Clerk, Lifetime CCM/MMC

Date Approved:  May 4, 2021

 

 

 

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